Related briefings

Online harms regulation – Sanctions but not criminal liability?

By Greta Barkle In April 2019, the UK published an Online Harms White Paper proposing a broad new statutory duty of care for social media companies and platform providers to tackle widespread concerns about a host of online issues, from terrorist and child sexual abuse content to cyber bullying and trolling. More than 18 months […]

The Serious Fraud Office: Extending its extraterritorial reach?

By Alex Swan BCL’s Alex Swan writes about the recently heard appeal of R(KBR Inc) v Director of the Serious Fraud Office, which raises issues regarding the extraterritorial effect of the SFO’s powers. Last week the Supreme Court heard the long-awaited appeal in the case of R (KBR Inc) v Director of the Serious Fraud Office.  The issue before […]

Lisa Osofsky reveals the SFO’s wish list

In a speech at the Royal United Services Institute last week, the Director of the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), Lisa Osofsky, revealed a list of measures that would, in her view, help to improve the SFO’s crime-fighting capabilities. New ‘failure to prevent’ offence Top of Ms Osofsky’s wish list (indeed, described by her as what […]

Latest Briefings

Protecting reputation in the spotlight of an investigation

Global business is increasingly familiar with the prospect of short-notice public investigatory attention, whether from regulators, law enforcement, political forces or as a consequence of sanctions, and this can – in in some cases – devastate individual and corporate reputation.

Protecting reputation in the spotlight of an investigation

Despite the fact that the threat of an investigation alone can be enough to paralyse a business, early warning signs are often missed and businesses can mistake an investigation risk for a reputation risk. Those who handle serious issues well are able to triage the issue at an early stage and identify its potential impact, […]

Bill 64 marks a new direction in Quebec privacy law — Key takeaways for businesses

On September 22, 2021, the Quebec government adopted Bill 64, An Act to modernize legislative provisions as regards the protection of personal information, enacting significant changes to the requirements governing the use and protection of personal information under various statutes, including notably the Act respecting the protection of personal information in the private sector and the Act respecting Access to documents held by public bodies and the Protection of personal information.

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kpmg

Linklaters leads on KPMG probe after chair’s “moaning” outburst

Linklaters is carrying out an investigation at KPMG, after the Big Four auditor’s UK chairman stood down over comments made earlier this week. Bill Michael was seen addressing several points on a video call, telling staff to “stop moaning” about the pandemic, while claiming they were fortunate to be “in a very lucky sector”. This […]

ASDA

City quartet lead in ASDA’s £2.75bn bond sale

Slaughter and May and Latham & Wakins are among the firms advising on the Issa Brothers’ sterling junk bond sale to fund the acquisition of Asda. The billionaire brothers have sold £2.75bn worth of debt through the bond. Slaughters is acting for Asda with a team led by finance partner Guy O’Keefe, alongside associates Charlie […]

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