Proceedings issued over Singapore Airlines Flight SQ368 emergency landing at Singapore Changi Airport

Stewarts’ Aviation team has issued proceedings in Chicago relating to Singapore Airlines Flight SQ368, which underwent an emergency landing at Singapore Changi Airport in June 2016.

On 27 June 2016 a Boeing 777-312ER aircraft operated by Singapore Airlines as Flight SQ368 was scheduled to fly from Singapore to Italy. The aircraft experienced engine difficulties after take-off and the crew elected to turn back.

After landing, a fire developed in the right hand engine. After the fire was brought under control the passengers disembarked.

Stewarts’ international Aviation team, in conjunction with Wisner Law Firm in the US, has commenced court proceedings in Chicago, Illinois, against the aircraft manufacturer (Boeing) and the engine manufacturer (General Electric), drawing from  extensive experience in previous airline incidents involving emergency landings and evacuations. Such experience includes British Airways Flight 38 at Heathrow in 2008, Lot Flight 16 at Warsaw in 2011, British Airways Flight 7762 at Las Vegas in 2015 and Emirates Flight EK521 at Dubai in 2016.

James Healy-Pratt, head of Aviation, and the leading claimant aviation lawyer in the UK commented: “The air accident investigation determined that a cracked tube within the right hand engine led to a fuel leak which ultimately caused the engine fire. It is alarming that a service bulletin had been released by the engine manufacturer prior to the accident warning of this very problem.

“Emergency landing cases present complex legal and technical challenges. Singapore Airlines did a superb and professional job of dealing with this emergency without any serious physical injuries to the majority of its passengers or crew. However, our experience of helping many passengers in aviation incidents such as this worldwide is that psychological trauma and smoke inhalation injuries are commonplace and often underestimated by many.

“These types of accidents can frequently be seconds away from a very different and more deadly conclusion.”