Related briefings

Hong Kong and China: a perspective

Amy Pope explains cyber security, geopolitical, and global business impact of UK opposition to China’s moves in Hong Kong, and what companies can do about it.

Piracy in 2020: The trends you need to know

Piracy has existed for as long as there has been maritime trade; it conjures images of sail ships, the jolly roger, treasure and buccaneers on the seven seas. Pirates in the twenty first century, however, are more familiar with semi-automatic weapons than a cutlass, while their treasure is less gold doubloons than hostages and the latest electric goods.

An EU first: sanctions, cyber-attacks and a global approach to prevention

At the end of July, the EU announced it was imposing its first ever sanctions against cyber-attacks. The sanctions, including a travel ban and an asset freeze, were put in place against the six individuals and three entities responsible for or involved in cyber-attacks such as WannaCry, NotPetya, Operation Cloud Hopper and the attempted attack against the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW).

Latest Briefings

EU-US Privacy Shield for data transfers ruled as invalid

The Office of the Data Protection Authority in Guernsey (ODPA) has warned companies in the Bailiwick to be aware of the recent Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) judgment which affects all businesses who transfer personal data outside of the Bailiwick and the European Union (EU).

Recognition and Assistance for PRC Insolvency in Hong Kong

Synopsis A recent case in Hong Kong, has demonstrated both the ability and willingness of common law courts to recognise insolvency appointments made by the courts of the People’s Republic of China (‘PRC’), and to grant appropriate assistance at common law. It is to be hoped that this proven track record will pave the way for easier recognition of common law court appointed liquidators in PRC, where, unlike in common law countries, such recognition is subject to the principle of reciprocity.

New LCIA Arbitration Rules: In force on 1 October 2020

The London Court of International Arbitration (LCIA) recently released its updated arbitration rules (the “2020 Rules”) which will come into force from 1 October 2020 and will apply to any arbitration commenced under the auspices of the LCIA on or after this date. The 2020 Rules, in the LCIA’s own words, aim to make the arbitral processes “even more streamlined and clear” for arbitrators and parties alike. We summarise nine key changes and one omission.

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