Reducing restrictions, increasing inconsistency? Impact of lockdown amendment regulations on police enforcement ability

The ‘lockdown’ has been slightly relaxed in England but much less so in the other three nations. In England, this relaxation was announced by the Prime Minister in a nationally televised address at 7pm on a Sunday. By 7am the next day, there was considerable uncertainty as to what he meant and from when he meant things to change.

Related briefings

One kingdom but four nations emerging from lockdown at four different rates under four different laws

Laws which criminalise what would otherwise be normal daily life and which the police must enforce must be clear, unambiguous, fair and fairly applied, logical and proportionate to the public health imperative. The purpose of this blog post is to illustrate the difficulties with the amended legislation, the inconsistencies between the laws of the four nations of the UK, as well as the problems of enforcement by the police.

Chief Coroner heralds the start of ‘Harlequin Inquests’

Just as the Crown Courts start to address the difficult issue of holding jury trials once more, so the Chief Coroner has sought to encourage Coroners, Practitioners, Interested Persons, Witnesses, the Press and Public as to how Inquests can or may be held as the lockdown is released, albeit gradually, and with social distancing maintained.

Nervous shock and the Material Gap: Paul v. Wolverhampton in the High Court

Written by John de Bono QC Published: 05 June 2020 On 4 November 2019 Master Cook struck out a nervous shock claim by the children of Mr Paul who collapsed and died from an untreated heart condition whilst out on a shopping trip with them in the centre of Wolverhampton. I wrote a blog piece commenting upon that […]

Latest Briefings

Medicinal Cannabis: What the Nation Needs?

David Hardstaff and Ami Amin discuss an in-depth report on policy developments in the UK by the Conservative Drug Policy Reform Group (the CDPRG) In Part A: why is it still so hard for patients to access the drugs they need? On 23 April 2020, the Conservative Drug Policy Reform Group (CDPRG) published Part A […]

Approval of liquidator’s remuneration: a tale of two reporters

A recent Sheriff Court judgment is the latest decision to consider the role and remit of the court reporter in a liquidation which, unusually, involved the court appointing two reporters. In Scotland, the Insolvency (Scotland) (Receivership and Winding Up) Rules 2018 provide that where there is no creditors committee, the remuneration of a liquidator shall […]

Variation to an office lease to allow use as a private members’ club

The Upper Tribunal has allowed a variation to a lease that restricted the use of a property to office use (with minor residential use) so that the tenant could implement a planning permission to convert the property into a private members’ club. Background A user clause in a lease is a restrictive covenant. If the […]

Tax now payable much sooner following a disposal of residential property

From 6 April 2020 significant changes will be made to the deadline for paying capital gains tax (CGT) and filing tax returns in respect of disposals by individuals and trusts of UK residential property. Taxpayers and advisers need to be aware of these changes now. UK property disposals prior to 6 April 2020 Previously, UK […]

Coronavirus job retention scheme: pensions aspects

When considering how to use the coronavirus job retention scheme (CJRS), employers may be wondering what this means for pension contributions and auto-enrolment obligations. This update considers some of the issues. How the CJRS works To access the CJRS an employer will need to designate affected employees as furloughed workers, notify the employees of this […]

Recommended

Recruit legal talent

Get your role in front of over 300,000 legal professionals when you advertise with The Lawyer. Our team of experts provide bespoke solutions to help solve all your recruitment challenges.

Find out more