Related briefings

Webinar: Digitizing your legal services – how law firms are adapting in today’s world

In the current operating environment legal teams are faced with an unprecedented challenge in reaching clients and maintaining high-value advice and service delivery. Law firms & corporate legal departments are having to rethink their traditional service delivery models and look to technology to serve their clients online, 24/7. In this webinar, Neota Logic will be […]

On-demand webinar: Action your design thinking

We all know the theory of agile project development. Break the project down into manageable chunks. Get a working prototype out quickly. Make continuous improvements based on how the users react rather than what committees write on Post-it notes. But in the legal world, putting agile into practice is not always easy.

The language of legal tech

This article is for the legal profession (actual or aspiring). It’s a quick run-down of some of the key tech terms used in the context of legal technology aimed to help you avoid being the one who drops ‘the Facebook’ or ‘the Google’ into conversation (note saying ‘the blockchain’ is permissible).

Latest Briefings

Time to go home: BP v Surrey County Council and RP

This case is of importance not only because it was likely to arise in other cases in the UK context of the coronavirus, but because Article 15 considerations arise in cases of grave importance, such as national security cases.

Cyprus: Predictability of criminal liability in relation to restrictions of movements due to Covid-9

The prohibition of unnecessary movements was implemented from the 24th of March, in accordance with the provisions of the Regulatory Administrative Act 117/2020. Subsequently, with the coming into force of the Regulatory Administrative Act 152/2020, from 13 April until 4 May, at 5:59 a.m., citizens without permission to commute due to work were only permitted one movement by exception, after following the SMS process, or the handwritten completion of Form B for persons above 65 years of age.

Digital media and the right to be forgotten

The “right to be forgotten”, which has become a trending right in the internet and digital media where even legal distribution and accure content of the information about individuals constitutes a violation of human rights, is of great importance especially for the dignity of these individuals, for independent development of their personalities and full authority over his/her personal data.

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