Contractual estoppel: A relatively new legal concept, a recent case and some practical advice

If the parties to an agreement state that a particular set of facts are true, neither party can then later contend the opposite so as to try to argue that the agreement is invalid, in an attempt to renege on the deal. This is the doctrine of contractual estoppel – a relatively new concept in English law.

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