The use of trademark protection mechanisms under new gTLD system

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By Ding Xianjie

Generic top-level domain (gTLD) is one of the top-level domains (TLD) managed by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Under the current gTLD system, there are only 22 gTLDs available (not including the TLDs representing 200-plus countries and territories, such as the .cn). These TLDs are generic terms representing the nature of the industry: .com means commercial organisations (but unrestricted); .edu refers to educational establishments; .gov refers to US government entities; and .net originally refers to network infrastructures (now unrestricted). The frequently used ones are .com, .edu, .net, .org, .info and .biz, but the most commonly used and the most popular one is undoubtedly .com.

A complete gTLD name comprises a character or a string of characters on the left of the delimiter ‘.’ and a TLD on the right, such as ‘kwm.com’. These are also called second-level domain names…

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