Latest Briefings

Why you might be accepting fake news without realising it

Do you believe everything you see? No matter how discerning or intelligent you are, we are all pre-programmed to be more accepting of information in certain contexts than others. While most of us are wise to the ‘Nigerian prince’ phishing scams of old, we are less likely to question an email from someone we know. We might question news on a website we’ve never seen before – but not in a publication we know well. And if we follow somebody high-profile on a social media platform we’re familiar with, like Instagram, chances are we take what they say at face value. It’s precisely because of this that mainstream media recently described influencer and celebrity accounts as ‘the gateway drug to fake news’.

Coronavirus: Impact of exceptional and temporary measures on enforcement proceedings [Portugal]

A number of exceptional measures have been introduced in the justice sector. These measures are set out in Law 1-A/2020 of 18 March and Decree‑Law 10-A/2020 of 13 March (as amended by Law 4-A/2020 of 6 April). The measures include exceptional rules on the extension of time limits and of the periods to take judicial steps. The rules will remain in place until the end of the exceptional situation to prevent, contain, mitigate and treat COVID-19.

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The work-life quiz

Andrew Sutch, senior partner, Stephenson Harwood What was your first ever job? Handing out questionnaires on an airline owned by Court Line, flying between London and New York. Court Line went bust a few months later. What was your worst experience as a trainee?Losing an application before the Master at the High Court, even though […]

One Essex Court – UK 100

Turnover: £28m Head of chambers: Lord Grabiner QC Total tenants (silks): 55 (18) plus 3 arbitrators Door tenants: 0 Chambers contributions: 10-11 per cent Revenue per barrister: £520,000 Top cases last year: JP Morgan Chase v West LB (‘Mahonia’); JJB Sports – Competition Appeals Tribunal; Vodaphone TMobile & ors v OFT & Competition Commission – […]

Watson Farley & Williams – UK 100

Turnover: £45m Profit per equity partner: £358,000 Equity spread: £150,000-£620,000 Net profit: £17m Profit margin: 38 per cent Salaried partner remuneration: Individual packages. Revenue per lawyer: £283,000 Revenue per partner: £714,000 Revenue per equity partner: £882,000 Cost per lawyer: £176,000 Profit per lawyer: £107,000 No of partners: 63 No of equity partners: 51 No of […]

Mills & Reeve – UK 100

Turnover: £36.1m Profit per equity partner: £224,000 Equity spread: £176,000-£316,000 Net profit: £12.8m Profit margin: 35 per cent Salaried partner remuneration: None Revenue per lawyer: £171,000 Revenue per partner: £531,000 Revenue per equity partner: £820,000 Cost per lawyer: £110,000 Profit per lawyer: £61,000 No of partners: 68 No of equity partners: 44 No of female […]

Forsters – Rising 50 – 2005

Turnover: £14m Revenue per partner: £636,400 Revenue per lawyer: £215,400 Total number of partners: 22 Total number of fee-earners: 75 Total number of fee-earners (excluding consultants, paralegals, trainees etc): 65 Total number of support staff: 64 Office: London Equity structure: Modified lockstep Core business: Primarily property and private client Clients: Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, British Airways […]

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