HFW board to review two-year managing partner term ahead of elections

Holman Fenwick Willan (HFW) is set to review the term length for its managing partners before its next elections in 2019.

Currently, managing partners at the firm serve a two-year term, and senior partner Richard Crump indicated to The Lawyer that this could be extended.

Marcus Bowman is the firm’s managing partner having won the election against partner George Eddings and began his first term on 1 April 2015. He won re-election last year and his current term runs until 31 March 2019.

While no date has been set for a review, the firm’s four-strong management board is expected to discuss the term length for the managing partner role. It is expected that any change to the current structure will be implemented from next year.

Crump was named HFW senior partner in 2007, succeeding Roderic O’Sullivan when he retired in April that year. He has is an HFW lifer, having joined the firm in 1979 and making partner eight years later.

Seven years into his time as senior partner, he became the first in the role from a UK firm to relocate from London to Asia. Crump has been based in Singapore ever since and has overseen partner numbers in the office nearly double, growing from 10 to 18 including a recent triple-partner hire.

The term length for senior partner at HFW lasts for three years and Crump’s next re-election will coincide with Bowman’s.

The firm undertook a review of its governance which saw the established of two separate boards; one for management and one for strategy.

The management board, chaired by Bowman, is responsible for operational procedures and day-to-day running of the firm. Crump has a seat on the management board but chairs the strategy board which is responsible for the firm’s long-term planning.

HFW’s latest LLP figures show that the firm’s topline grew by 14 per cent last year, rising from £144.3m to £164.6m.

Data gathered for The Lawyer UK200: Top 100 shows HFW generated more than half of its turnover outside of its home jurisdiction last year. Overseas turnover counted for 55 per cent of the firm’s total revenue in 2016/17.