Slaughters and Eversheds win roles on Shell’s bid for First Utility

Eversheds Sutherland and Slaughter and May won the lead mandates as Royal Dutch Shell acquired 100 per cent of energy provider First Utility.

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Leigh Day loses bid to recover £5.8m legal costs in Iraq War case

The Solicitors Disciplinary Tribunal (SDT) has ruled that the Leigh Day lawyers acquitted of professional misconduct will not recover their legal costs.

The human rights firm applied to have 75 per cent of its total costs – thought to be £7.5m before the SDT hearing – covered by the prosecuting body, the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), after the tribunal dismissed all of the allegations of misconduct against the firm’s co-founder Martyn Day and solicitors Sapna Milk and Anna Jennifer Crowther.

Register now to The Lawyer to access our latest news stories, read selected briefings from key firms and gain essential careers insight to help you make the most of your current and future roles.

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