Which? makes formal "bullying" complaint about Davenport Lyons

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  • which consumer?

    I was interested that Which? is apparently a consumer group. Instead of jumping to the supposed defence of those who allegedly rip off the intellectuall property of others, it should pause to think about consumers like me who pay for this via legitimate purchases.

    I trust that the SRA has better things to do than get involved in a spat no doubt inteded to generate publicity for a group that seems to be losing its moral compass in life.

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  • Moral compass?

    Moral compass? Get off your high horse. These actions are misguided and prone to error. See all the prosecutions of children, pensioners and the like (...although why pensioners should be presumed to be innocent of downloading gay porn is open to debate.)

    The industry's persecution of the very people who should be its customers is a damning indictment of an industry that has completely lost its way in the digital age. What kind of a moron sues his own customers?!

    To complain about moral compasses shows that you are just as out of date as the idiots in charge of the big record companies.

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  • Not customers

    Clearly those being sued are not customers hence the reason why are being sued - for downloading without payment

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  • RE:Which Consumer

    Andrew Keogh i couldn't agree with you more. People who spend their hard earned money on titles such as Army F*ckers have every right to feel let down when people receive a copy for free...

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  • RE: Not Customers

    Except for the small point that many of those sent such letters either *are* customers, or haven't downloaded anything illegally. The dead people, pets, etc. who have been sent letters probably aren't great customers, but I don't think it logically follows that they should get sued.

    The main problem for the media companies is, in the proportionally few instances these things actually get to court, they quite often lose. Scaring a family into forking over £3000 is a lot easier than proving criminal liability based on generally flimsy evidence.

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  • We don't know enough

    I think it is too soon to pass comment on whether or not DL has been "bullying" at all. I have not seen the letter, and so far as I am aware it has not been published. DL's clients must have the right, as with any copyright owner, to protect its intellectual property, irrespective of its content, provided that content is not illegal. It is also perfectly proper for DL to accept those instructions.

    If there is evidence that copyright has been breached, DL can demand appropriate payment of royalties by way of settlement rather than go to court.

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  • What are DigiProtect?

    As I understand the position, the copyright owners in each case only get a very small proportion of the £500. So essentially the majority is made up of some kind of perverse profit share between DL and DigiProtect... lovely. I am sure that a lot of firms would like to make the most of the potential profits, although clearly scraping the bottom of the barrel quality-wise....

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  • We don't know enough

    For those who don't watch the BBC, Watchdog on Monday evening ran this story. They had computer experts examine the hard drives of some of the people that had contested the accusations and it would seem that this proved that the content had not been downloaded.

    In at least one of the cases (missed a bit getting dinner) the person was able to prove she was elsewhere and could not have downloaded this rubbish. So in many cases there was no evidence of copyright breaches. And the letters that were shown looked very heavy and threatening to me!

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  • Evidence

    I think that is the point.. the evidence is shaky at best. However, the letters are full-on. Not the sort of letters you would expect from solicitors dealing with the man on the street. How many of these people are realistically going to get legal advice from a lawyer that knows what they are doing with IP. Setting the "royalty" - or "penalty" - at the rate means that a suitable level of profit is realised by DigiProtect.

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  • Bullying is not the only issue

    It seems to me that the real issue here is clamping down on the pornographers who make and freely distribute this sort of stuff on the Internet, and the prostitutes they employ to "act" in their films.

    Allowing distributors to use lawyers and the courts to obtain payment for such material (particularly if the downloaders inferred that it was legal and free because it was freely available) is just encouraging pornographers.

    Paying people to have sex, on film or not, is prostitution (and may involve human trafficking and exploitation). All those profiting from this activity, including the alleged copyright owners, could therefore be argued to be living off the proceeds of prostitution, ie pimping.

    Perhaps the solution is to remove copyright protection from pornography. Then the distributors would not be able to profit from carelessly making their material available on the net without proper safeguards - and then cleaning up later with demands from lawyers, so they would police their own operations to get paid at the point of sale. But no doubt someone will tell me that that is too simplistic an analysis.

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