Unsettled weather ahead for graduates

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  • Would love law schools to tell students this prior to asking them to spend ££££'s on an LPC

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  • If someone is planning on starting the LPC and isn't by that stage aware of the state of the graduate/legal recruitment market then why should the law school need to spell it out to them?

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  • I agree with Anonymous @ 2:04. Everyone is aware or should be, of the risks of undertaking the LPC without a TC.

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  • It easy to sit here inside the profession and say Students should be aware, but if you are an undergrad, without too many industry contacts, you are, to a large extent, reliant on what the institutions, career advisors and those at law fairs tell you.
    Speaking from (fairly) recent experience, they do have a tendency to self promote and sugar coat the pill.

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  • I too have (fairly) recent experience, being somone who has gone through the LPC and struggled to get into the profession (still not sitting inside it)...of course law colleges sugar coat the issue, they are businesses marketing themselves.
    If a career advisor is telling students that the graduate market is buoyant and the students are believing them then I don't really think the blame lies with the colleges. Undergrads are at university after all, I assume they have the ability to read newspapers...

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  • Looking outside London for a moment, firms such as Hewitsons LLP (Cambridge/Northampton/MK) have retained 83% of trainees this year (5/6), and have a vacancy for a further NQ.
    Whilst the number of TC vacancies across the country has undoubtedly shrunk this year, it is a nonsense because in 2 years' time, when the economy will surely have picked up at least a little, there won't be enough trainees. A further example of the fallacy of recruiting 2 years in advance.

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  • "A further example of the fallacy of recruiting 2 years in advance"
    What sort of English is that?

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  • The retention figures we're all waiting for are:

    1) Mills and Reeve (36% of trainees retained last year; the worst of all UK firms listed)

    2) Dickinson Dees (36% of trainees retained last year; the worst of all UK firms listed).

    I guess Dickie Dees probably earned the wooden spoon last time (as they had the second worst retention the year before with 47%).


    I wonder what weather symbol that would get?

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  • Re Anonymous @ 20-Jul-2012 5:10pm

    The notion that law firms should recruit trainees 2 years in advance is a fallacy. Reducing the number of trainee positions at a time when so many trainees are not necessarily needed, to reflect a time in the future when the climate may have changed and additional trainees might be required, is a prime example of why the notion is a fallacy. I used the word “further” because other instances reported in the press in the last couple of years have highlighted the concept as a fallacy, and this article is a further example in addition to those examples already reported. Is that clearer?

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  • Lawyers are waaaaaaaaaay overpaid anyways - especially in the Middle East.

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