Training contract vacancies slump as recession bites

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  • "Allen & Overy has closed its applications for training contracts starting in September 2011 and March 2012 ahead of schedule.

    Fellow magic circle firm Clifford Chance has also filled all the spots on its August 2011 and February 2012 intakes and will no longer be running any training contract assessment centres for those cohorts."

    No mention is made that they filled up on non-law students, mainly those from a Basket Weaving background.

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  • Indiana Pwns - Am I right in saying you do not approve of any non-law degree candidates applying for TCs? Or do you just not approve of non-law degree holders with Mickey Mouse degrees applying for TCs?

    Times are very tough for the graduates of 2009. But it is still possible to get a TC.

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  • I disagree with preference being given to non-law graduates looking for legal positions, especially when they have Mickey Mouse degrees and little, if any, legal experience.

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  • Indiana Pwns - Interesting. I have a science degree but I do not think I was given preference at all when I secured my training contract. I paralegalled and showed a liking and understanding for IP. If you look at the average intake, I think about 70% have law degrees??

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  • I am very offended by the comments made by the law graduates here. I am a mature LPC student and finding it just as hard to get a TC. -it is even harder if you are not 21 years old. Please just grow up and stop throwing your toys out of the pram.

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  • There's no reason why any law firm would hire someone who isn't the right person for them. If they choose someone for whatever reason then clearly that person has the sorts of skills that they want.

    It's also a gross generalisation to say that anyone who did non-law did a mickey mouse degree and to assume from that that they have no experience or knowledge.

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  • I cannot believe the comment made by Indiana Pwns: it is offensive and shows a lack of understanding about how the legal profession currently is.

    Who says those with non law degrees probably don't have legal experience? I completed a non law degree and have had legal experience going back to my mid -teens. The point I'm trying to make is that all non law graduates need a CHANCE. Most vacancies for paralegal positions or TCs favour those who have long term legal experience: how on earth are those graduates who seek experience are meant to get it if employers want it beforehand??? Even a five year old can tell you that its a viscious circle. This attitude by recruiting employers has stop: we all have to start from SOMEWHERE.

    As for thinking you are better than the others for having a law degree: you obviously don't know how the profession works in practice. Any lawyer will tell you that knowledge of the law is important but not the be all. No client cares about the ambiguities or complexities of so and so piece of legislation nor do they want to know when it came into force. And yes for the record I have worked in the profession for three years after my GDL & LPC: so I do what law is like in practice. Despite all that, even I am also struggling to find a TC.

    So get your head out of the law textbook and learn some PEOPLE SKILLS.

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  • I agree with the previous 2 posters. I have heard almost all the lawyers at Bristows have a science degrees. That makes perfect sense considering they are a top IP firm.

    I think candidates with good non-law degrees are valuable business assets as they can talk the clients' language. Also, mature candidates provide a wealth of commercial and business knowledge.

    So it is very unfair to pour scorn on non-law degree holders/mature candidates.

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  • Everyone seems to be arguing about trying to get a TC at a top law firm. The first comment mentions CC and A & O but are they really the be and end all of a legal career? Long hours, not much time for a social life, and probably no happiness until the day you get your P45 and you retire and leave the city. I know, my uncle does it and admits he isn't happy.

    Graduate positions just put you in a box, and people are forgetting that you might be a graduate but there are plenty of normal jobs out there which can give you people skills and some exposure to legal work like mine as an admin assistant at a national law firm. I'm going on to do my CPE but I know I can come back and get that all important expereince, which some claim, non-law grads don't have.

    For grads who don't have a TC lined up, don't fear. You'll get one and some time out might make you decide what's right for you, and make you wonder whether the shinny lights of london and the large salaries are really for you.

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  • Doing a law degree is a poor use of 3 years' time. You'd be well advised to do a technical subject which would help you in practice; Science for IP, Maths for Corporate Law & Private Client. The GDL and LPC is enough law for city employers.

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