Top firms losing out to upstarts in social media sphere

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  • Just because someone has clicked to 'follow' a Twitter feed does not mean that they read all, or indeed any, of the garbage coming out of it.

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  • That's the point. This doesn't measure how many followers or how many tweets. It looks at who someone is connected to, how likely they are to get content re-tweeted (and by whom) and a host of other metrics that weed out people who simply use Twitter to broadcast.

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  • Good to see that, judging by the pic, The Lawyer has its finger right on the most up to date technology out there. Where can I get one of those new-fangled machines?!

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  • what utter rubbish. Gateleys are above such matters. We actually talk to people rather than tweet them.

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  • how can we find it?

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  • Yes, I am sure the client base of the firms who are "missing out" is crumbling fast as their clients rush to switch work to firms who are "influential" online. Goodbye rest-of-the-magic circle, you've been out-tweeted and out-facebooked by A&O.

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  • Who the hell are "Burness"?
    I would be deeply embarrassed rather than proud if my firm were to be classed as well known by the airheads who `tweet' and record every moment of their unbearably dull and pointless existences on Facebook.
    And it's an interesting phenomenon that since the QS franchise was launched I've dealt with 3 different firms of `Quality Solicitors', all of whom were very significantly less co-operative and efficient than average.
    I suspect that for many of the firms who are signing up it's a last, desperate throw of the dice before they disappear.

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  • This 'survey' is hardly cutting edge or adding much to the debate - all it consists of is punching the names of Twitter accounts into Klout's website and then putting them into a table. Solely using third-party tools such as Klout or PeerIndex to measure online influence is dangerous for professional services brands. These tools can be a useful indicator, but are designed for B2C brands (so no surprises that QualitySolicitors comes tops!) and are heavily influenced by factors irrelevant to law firms, particularly network size. Law firms using social media don't need to get distracted by measures such as these but should rather focus on basics like audience and message.

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  • I'm going to give Penningtons all my work. Although maybe it is no coincidence that most of the firms at the bottom of this "survey" sound genuinely Victorian. Only Speechly Bircham is missing and admittedly Cobbetts doesn't belong up the top.
    But anyway, this survey is pure poo. I wish The Lawyer wouldn't publish it every year. It just encourages idiot consultants.

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  • Seconding the many comments above, surely the relevant measure is the influence over clients? For QualitySolicitors, where the aim is to generate awareness/closeness with consumers what they're doing is brilliant.
    Evaluating both global City firms and startup high street firms in the same way is questionable though. Good law firms certainly don't apply such broad brush treatment to their clients. Do good PR consultancies?

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