The pointlessness of a law degree

  • Print
  • Comments (93)

Readers' comments (92)

  • Well done to the C of L for trying to make the law degree more relevant, more focused, and shorter!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • This is actually pretty offensive to people who have done a law degree and have gained a great deal from it, and it is a shame to put future students off. In my view there is no other degree which trains your mind to think about things in a legal way and from my experience people who have done certain other degrees or the GDL simply have not acquired those skills. The discussion of the postal acceptance rule etc. is just a means by which those skills are acquired. The law degree is not about learning law. I gained a huge amount from my LLB and whilst I would also love to do degrees in Economics, History, Spanish, English Literature and Politics, there isn't time. I can pick these up as hobbies and I wouldn't change what I have done.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • A half-arguable point stretched to destruction, in my view; and if "It would be odd that anyone actually paid to provide legal advice would ever read a learned journal article" is a genuinely-held belief I wouldn't like to be one of this guy's clients. There are often commercially practical nuggets in those sorts of pieces even if they can sometimes be a little academic.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Some of my (trainee) colleagues genuinel believe an extrapolation of this article: that their GDL+LPC= LLB. I can only believe that this is because it has been so well marketed to them.
    The debate over law v non- law will rage as long as it is an option (and it should remain an option: some of the brightest lawyers I know are non-law graduates, equally, some are law graduates). If someone has the requisite skills to be a good lawyer it doesn't matter what degree they do. However, to allow a 3 year specialist degree to be devalued (law is harder than most BA degrees) so that institutions like CoL and BPP can handle out additional qualifications is insulting to those who slaved away for 3 years to get an LLB.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Law is not a pointless Degree.
    If you must know, nearly 1/3rd of the world's legal system is based on the English Legal System.
    A Law degree is a must if you want to practice law in most places except UK.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Trainee at a US firm
    "In my view there is no other degree which trains your mind to think about things in a legal way and from my experience people who have done certain other degrees or the GDL simply have not acquired those skills."
    You're right. Jonathan Sumption seems to be lacking the skills you set out. Perhaps a trainee at a US firm could give him some pointers.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • DAG is just trolling - he only wants your attention and some confirmation that someone has read his piece.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I fully concur with this article, and it represents what I have thought for a long time.
    I studied both LLB and computer programming, and can confirm that preparing a contract is pretty much like preparing computer code (Code: Definitions, variables, procedures, logic gates, data. Contracts: Definitions, clauses, conditions, schedules).
    The LLB gave me a solid grounding in common law, which is useful in my line of law (Projects), though not essential. I am 10-years qualified and cannot recall the last time I read a case or undertook thorough legal research. One of the areas we studied during the first year of LL.B was the historical property rights of North American native Indians. I have no idea how that could be applied in business.
    I concur that law degrees, as with other "art" degrees, are very academic and theoretical in nature with limited application in modern business, though great if you want to be an academic. Science and economics degrees do however have practical application if you pursue a career in these fields.
    Having said all of this, I would say that law degree would be of more use to a barrister than to a solicitor.
    if I could turn back time, I would have studied for a language or a science.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • But does it do any good to have lots of musicians who can't read music?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I agree with some of this article but don't think you could say that completing an LLB can be worse than useless.
    A lot of modern contract law is based on centuries of case law and it is often important to know the historical basis in order to know why certain clauses are drafted like they are. I often see GDL lawyers modify contractual clauses without realising that they are worded that way for a very specific reason - trust or partnership law is a big one for this.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

View results 10 per page | 20 per page | 50 per page |

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (93)