Sets impose diversity training regime on clerks

  • Print
  • Comments (13)

Readers' comments (13)

  • Barristers chambers need to train their staff over diversity issues???This is a sorry state of affairs, surely?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Barristers' chambers are shockingly lacking in professionalism. Cocaine, harassment, strip clubs... I have seen it all. Barristers' chambers need to do a lot more than send their clerks to a training course for a few hours.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • We should applaud the intention but the research suggests most 'diversity training' will have but a short term effect on knowledge, which wanes after about 3 months and often just confuses by imparting knowledge we fail to retain fully. It isn't about knowledge, it is about impacting attitudes and training rarely effectively addresses this much tougher nut.. Turkeys do not vote for Christmas, which is why changes in the make-up of chambers and the way clients are impacted by the snowy peaks within the law (and most other professions) wil not be accomplished by force feeding training.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Diversity training in clerks’ rooms and practice teams is an important step to educate people on acceptable language and behaviour in a modern day professional services environment. It’s often not out malice, but ignorance that people behave in a certain way, and do not realise that what they are saying and doing is causing offence to others (colleagues, members, clients).
    These teams are busy, highly charged environments often full of noise and banter. They are great places to work.
    So the important thing is to educate and raise awareness about diversity issues, but an even more important thing is for staff to recognise how important it is, and to ensure their teams operate with dignity and respect for each other and don’t allow unacceptable language and behaviour to perpetuate. This requires robust, fair and transparent staff management, and that probably requires another training course!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It looks like you have been watching to much sil mate

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Looks likes someones been watching to much of a bbc programme

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Diversity blah. I wish I'd jumped on that particular gravy train before it left the station.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Diversity training in clerks’ rooms and practice teams is an important step to educate people on acceptable language and behaviour in a modern day professional services environment (We've read the reports about 4 New Square and we're scared!!!). It’s often not out malice, but ignorance that people behave in a certain way, and do not realise that what they are saying and doing is causing offence to others (colleagues, members, clients). These teams are busy, highly charged environments often full of noise and banter. They are great places to work. (Sounds grim) So the important thing is to educate and raise awareness about diversity issues, but an even more important thing is for staff to recognise how important it is, and to ensure their teams operate with dignity and respect for each other and don’t allow unacceptable language and behaviour to perpetuate. This requires robust, fair and transparent staff management, and that probably requires another training course and more wasted time and money! Yawn.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Undertaking Diversity is an important first step. However, what needs to follow is developing a strategy that tackles unconscious bias that may prevail within the organisation/Chambers. Given the key role that equality cases set, it is vital that all who work within that culture fully understand the need to be viewed as fair and inclusive.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • PC gone mad, i agree with Dr PJ a training course will never change a persons inner being, it merely wastes and hour of their lives letting someone get paid a ridiculous for telling them what they already know is wrong! I now have to attend a 'how to lift a box' course and i am 43, they got no chance!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • A very interesting article, and praiseworthy comment from Ms Illing. Although some here seem to focus on whether or not the training will actually change attitudes, surely an equally important point is that in providing the training, the sets will be less likely to be held to be principally culpable in future cases of discrimination. Also, let's not forget that most of the City business and legal cases which we have seen going to tribunal/court are not about a little bit of harmless banter. I, for one, would not want my female relatives in some of those offices.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It is not surprising that the Bar's response to this issue has met with cynism, when seemingly it takes the prospect of bad publicity or a lawsuit to prompt any action, rather than taking proactive steps for the right reasons in the first place. That said, surely it is better to react than not to act at all and these steps must be commended, provided E&D is treated as an ongoing process rather than a box to tick by providing easily-forgotten, one-off training sessions.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • It is not surprising that the Bar's response to this issue has met with cynicism, when seemingly it takes the prospect of bad publicity or a lawsuit to prompt any action, rather than taking proactive steps for the right reasons in the first place. That said, surely it is better to react than not to act at all and these steps must be commended, provided E&D is treated as an ongoing process rather than a box to tick by providing easily-forgotten, one-off training sessions.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (13)