Scottish Lord Advocate wants court on the box

The Scottish Lord Advocate Colin Boyd QC has come out in favour of live television broadcasts in Scottish courts

He also wants to enter into consultation with Scottish television companies on how best to do it.
BBC Scotland in-house lawyer Alistair Bonnington, a member of the Scottish Media Lawyers Society, said the organisation is now expecting to enter into consultation with Boyd.

“One would hope that televising the courts would bring the Rumpole style back”
Duncan Lamont, Charles Russell

“Scottish media lawyers are now expecting to enter into a dialogue with the Lord Advocate about his needs, the needs of our clients and the media law issues related to cameras in court,” he said.
Last month, BBC Scotland gained permission to broadcast the appeal of the Lockerbie trial live over the internet. In a keynote speech made in Edinburgh last week, Boyd said that televising some court cases live would be a powerful tool in communicating the role and function of the courts.
Cameras have been allowed in Scottish courts since 1992, but court sessions were only allowed to be shown on television after the case had finished.
Scottish television lawyer Duncan Lamont, a partner at Charles Russell, says that live television would improve litigating and speed up the court process.
“The Rumpole of the Bailey-style of litigating is gone. It's all 'let's go to bundle 137' as lawyers try to spend as much time as possible in court,” he said. “One would hope that televising the courts would bring the Rumpole style back because televising the courts would speed things up.”