Riot and wrong

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  • Other stark examples include expenses fraud in Parliament for which few MPs were prosecuted and fewer still had to pay all the money back, bankers who bring the country to the brink of collapse and still get multi-million pound bonuses, police who get cash in brown envelopes from newspapers for disclosing information.
    If our leaders and the richest in our society are not setting the right example, it is hardly surprising that the underclass are going to think they can get away with it too.

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  • Mr Myers, unless I have misunderstood your conclusion, you appear to believe that more ‘power, organisation and authority’ are called for to preserve civilised society, but these things have hardly deteriorated over the years. Instead society is already perceived to have become considerably more authoritarian. It is the taboo element that is rapidly being lost. Golding had it right in pointing to the power of taboo. We must recognise that it would not be practically possible to keep law and order by force alone. In the lawless limit we would need to have one policeman for every non-policeman in society.
    The solution is to abandon the experiment in social engineering known as Moral Relativism. Nobody seems actively to advocate Moral Relativism but somehow or other we have got it in full measure nevertheless and we must rid ourselves of it completely. We must return to ‘old-fashioned’ schooling without delay and we must teach old-fashioned values and, although it is a highly reactionary notion, we know with absolute certainty that it worked before because we did it and equally confidently we can assert that Moral Relativism does not work because we have the clear evidence before us.
    A society with a very high population density cannot operate without some conditioning of its constituent individuals. If this conditioning is deemed tantamount to brain washing, then so be it. The taboo element to behaviour must be recovered, strengthened, applied and maintained.

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  • you raise a good point, and I agree that this is a problem, hence: Criminals to whom 'such taboos are alien.' Thanks for the comment!

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  • Has this robber looting Fest at last compelled a major and open debate about the moral underpinnings of society? Or will the establishment illiberal 'liberalism' manage to stop it? The BBC is not announced any major set piece debates, eg Janet Daley vs Evan Davies, or Peter Hitchens vs Andrew Marr, or Melanie Philips vs Harriet Harman/Theresa May.
    For lawyers, I would have thought Human Rights, that set of abstract laws disconnected from any actual society and its institutions needed to enforce such rights often for those working against such institutions, would be a hot issue in Jurisprudence? But no: the lawyers, like the bankers, are equally in it for the money and bling!

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