RBS posits Mexican wave model to cut legal outlay

  • Print
  • Comments (6)

Readers' comments (6)

  • In theory this is a very good idea but how would it work in practice? The firms may have been well evaluated but does that necessarily mean that they'll work well together? Who will oversee the work - the dominant firm in the pairing or someone at RBS? What happens if things go wrong further down the line - who'll take responsibility for errors? If they can work all that out it could be a very beneficial arrangement and one that will save money for the bank we all own. That would be good given that the legal spend id £200m!!!!!!
    It's only a mater of time before more inhouse lawyers look at this I reckon.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • One wonders whether this could end up being something of a false economy unless RBS can guarantee fixed fees on all their transactions.
    Otherwise, it might be a case that lower fees come hand in hand with an increase in billable hours as the firms work out how to offer something that's fully joined up.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Duplication of work could certainly be an issue here but so long as it was well managed there's no reason why it would be a deal breaker. legal process outsourcing is no longer a scary concept for most firms, but it has its drawbacks, such as the amount of time you have to devote to training the team working on your account. This would potentially be much easier to put in place and to verify what the quality would be upfront.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I work for an LPO, Zeta Intelex. Have also worked as a solicitor in London for a couple of years.

    RBS has the wrong end of the problem. Non standardization, hoarding of knowledge, anti-KM and anti-collaborative practices happen because legal work is distributed within the firm in a whimsical, capricious and error prone manner. LPO in fact would not appeal, if the process of allocating work was reasonable.

    Its a self feeding cycle of errors, work gets allocated on random basis, which have nothing to do with consumer welfare, and knowledge stays muddled. Knowledge stays muddled, there is no way to objectively track merit, and work continues to be allocated on random basis.

    Its rich if RBS thinks that it could leverage the fundamental problem afflicting an employed solicitor's work life to solve consequent problems.

    It won't work, simply because this fundamental problem did not originate at the workplace at all, but has its roots in how lawyers get trained. Or rather, in how they do not get trained.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • what on earth does the LPO'er's comments mean??!?? Its no wonder LPO arrangements do not work if that type of person is behind them. Good grief!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Please stop using the term "Mexican Wave" to explain this concept. The world is global now and firms and corporations can not afford to allienate the Latin America and Mexican market places or talent that comes from these regions. The proper term would be "maquiladora" which really refers to the old miller's portion concept for grain mills. Moreover, the practice of maquiladoras spans all through Latin America, and it is not solely something that is set up in Mexico. Challenge yourself to find better words that do not offend a large number of people, even if it just for the sake of your company's image and reputation. The world is now an international place and survival requires respect across cultures and countries.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (6)