Para-troopers

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  • "several firms require a law degree and some will not even consider candidates who have not completed the LPC" yet they expect you to not be looking for a training contract? Firms cannot expect the best qualified candidates to stay in paralegal roles forever; if they are recruiting these people it is inevitable that they will eventually want to move on/up.

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  • Yes I agree but , I think you just have to find a way to not show that that is all you want. I think they prob just want you to be open to the career you're applying to. So when they ask why you want to work there, you don't say "I think it will be good experience to finally gain a TC" but "I am really interested in exploring other legal careers". Don't ask if there is room for you to move into a training contract, instead inquire about the structure of the firm. Chances are if they only have a small intake of trainees they prob will often opt to hire from within. Also see if they advertise trainee roles on their website - if they don't, they prob recruit from within.

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  • O’Connell says: “A general benefit of paralegals, apart from lower costs, is that firms can get very good people to do good work without the hassle brought with ­solicitors, such as requirements for continuing professional development, professional indemnity insurance (PII) and close Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) scrutiny.”

    I don't understand this comment.

    If a paralegal screws up - it's on the firm's insurance.

    Furthermore the paralegal is indirectly regulated by the SRA. It is it likely the firm will be held responsilbe should the paralegal start breaking the Solicitors' Code of Conduct.

    Furthermore, the SRA can 'black list' a paralegal, by banning firms from employing them.

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  • @anonymous 8:31am: I believe Paralegals still have to have PII but it is only around £400 while for a solicitor it is several thousands! The other things you've mentioned go hand-in-hand with practicing the law in general - nothing to do with being a paralegal - just the things that could happen to any type of legal practitioner.
    O'Connells comment merely states that hiring a paralegal is less hassle compared to a solicitor. If a solicitor or paralegal screws up obviously that would be a hassle.

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  • What planet is the Institute of Paralegals on!! First of all Paralegals should be required to do CPD as it is a fantastic why of updating oneself in a particular practice area. Secondly is it me or is the Institute condoning the exploitation of paralegals. If paralegals are doing more complex, high level work then they should be paid reasonably for such work. This organisation should follow the example of its American counterpart. In the USA paralegals are much more regarded and paralegals are seen as a professionals alongside other lawyers unlike in the UK. In the UK being a paralegal is not seen as a career in itself but organisations such as CILEX are doing great things to promote the work of paralegals. paralegals are a useful resource as most paralegals are eager to impress and prove their worth also it is a great way of gaining a training contract with an employer especially when working in-house.

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