Oxford Brookes responds to LPC closure criticism

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  • The letter said: it is irresponsible that for financial gain the uni is making students who it promised a course move providers,
    The reply said: we are unable to continue the course for financial reasons, so we are moving our students?? Think harder, Brookes...

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  • Stinks of litigation, Brookes. How much is that going to cost you now?! Looks like your management team need a crash course in law themselves.

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  • This is nothing more than a rehashing of the original 'business decision' line, completely sidestepping our original point that it was not the REASONING behind the decision but the MANNER with which it was executed that was so irresponsible. Cuts across the sector are obviously going to have a knock-on effect on applications beyond the university's control. However, the LPC is not just a postgraduate course to pursue further study, but a fundamentally practical one geared towards securing a potentially life-long career path, and what Brookes DID have complete control over, not to mention an important responsibility to uphold, was ensuring that the many aspiring law students who have already committed a substantial amount of time, money and life decisions around this career choice would not risk losing any more under their university’s own negligence.

    To expand upon the wider ramifications of this decision mentioned above, I have GDL coursemates who now suddenly face an expensive commute/relocation to continue their studies with little financial preparation or expected compensation, and may not even be able to continue their legal studies at all having made family plans and entire relocations for the next two years or more. Assurances of a guaranteed place on the LPC (still being advertised online at the time of the original email) and an LLB for completing both stages at Brookes were undoubtedly motivating factors for many to apply here in the first place, and KNOWING these would encourage people to make long-term plans here the university surely had a responsibility to at least provide SOME sort of notice or not laud about such crucial 'guarantees' in their advertising to ensure those who COULD not afford to take such risks (ie those would never have started at Brookes or switched careers into law in the first place had they known even the possibility of this occurring) would not have the rug pulled out under them like this.

    Yet mere weeks before the announcement we were still being encouraged by tutors to start thinking about applying to the LPC here, advising that the university was trying to gauge numbers but with no hint whatsoever it was because a closure was on their hands. LawCab applications operate on a rolling basis, so it was hardly an urgent matter for many considering they thought they were guaranteed a place. Had it been made clear earlier that continuing the LPC would be conditional upon seeing sufficient interest by a certain time (say, the meeting of the final decision), people would have at least had the chance to respond accordingly or start at least fathoming contingency options. A few days before the announcement a coursemate found that the LPC option had already been taken off LawCabs even before WE had been told the news let alone remotely consulted, and the callousness of announcing such an impactful decision on the LPCers right in the middle of their exams, was unwarranted.

    As Professor Kilday's response so clearly states, they have had clear warning signs for the past five years, and the university's disregard for any consideration of the likely consequences on the students’ welfare will be an unfortunate and damning blot on the courses' otherwise favourable reputation across the legal education sector, even if the LPC is reinstated in the future.

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  • If my provider did this to me I would be livid. Sincere sympathy for all those who had committed themselves to a course which the provider could not be bothered to commit to themselves. GDL Student above raises some excellent points which should have been at the forefront of OxILP's decision to revoke the LPC and each one deserves a full explanation.

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