Categories:Middle East

Riyadh-mission ticket

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  • Another meaningless smoke and mirrors article about Saudi Arabia.

    There are no available law licenses for Saudi female law graduates and so career prospects at the moment within the Kingdom are non-existant. While it is nice to have a female graduate in the office, they cannot attend at the Ministries, they cannot attend at the courts, and they have the usual limited legal and research skills as male Saudi graduates (who can, in time, obtain a law licence and go on to have a career as a lawyer).

    So we take the female graduates in for a year or two, make the right corporate responsibility noises, and spend time and money on training. The female graduates (who are not lawyers because they cannot get a licence) realise they are going nowhere in their careers and they leave to study overseas or because they get married to Saudi men who do not want their wives to be mixing with male lawyers, especially western male lawyers.

    Come back in 20 years and by then you may have something to write about.

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  • This is quite old news A&O Riyadh has been employing female trainees and interns for over a year now. In fact informed sources rate them far higher in terms of work ethics than many male counterparts.

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  • @2:07pm

    But the point is that they are not lawyers and cannot be lawyers until the authorities allow female law graduates to obtain a law licence.

    Until then they are just back-room staff who will move on sooner rather than later.

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  • @8.43am Not sure what the law licence actually adds apart from the ability to sell it to a western firm seeking an association!

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  • @2:17pm

    If you don't know the difference between being a licensed lawyer capable of acting for a client and representing that client before courts and authorities and being a back-room researcher and general dogs-body then I wonder why you think you are qualified to make any comment at all.

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  • @11:06am - Completely barbaric to say the female Saudi lawyers leave becuase their husbands don't allow them to work with Western lawyers. 99% of these female lawyers are in these positions because they are from progressive and forward-thinking families/social circles (of which there are many in Saudi cities). Many female lawyers in Saudi also go onto in-house counsel roles where they can progress without a licence.

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  • Many Saudi female lawyers also move on to in-house counsel positions. That allows them to progress without a licence to practice.

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  • Oh please excuse me for being barbaric, but it doesn't matter how progressive your family is if your husband has issues with his wife interacting with other males. I have yet to meet any of the wives of any of the Saudis I have worked with during my time in Saudi Arabia. Perhaps I just work with non-progressive Saudi men.

    Also, after 4 years working in Saudi Arabia I have yet to come across a Saudi female in-house counsel. Can you let me know which family groups or companies they are working for so I can do a mea culpa.

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  • The article missed Baker & McKenzie which was one of the first (if not the first) firm to hire female lawyers in RIyadh and at many points females have constituted half the lawyers in the Riyadh office! Have to say that most of them are promising and talented.

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  • @BR

    Are they lawyers?

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