The pointlessness of a law degree

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  • I can't say I have scrolled through the 5 pages of comments so I apologise if I am about to repeat what has already been said.
    As an individual who took the GDL/LPC route as opposed to an LLB, I disagree with this articles' extreme degradation of an LLB. As a final seat trainee I have had a good number of appraisals, and a common theme certainly in the earlier ones was that my underlying understanding of certain "basic" legal concepts was not perhaps as thorough or as deep as my peers who had completed an LLB. I would hasten to add that this isn't due to a lack of intelligence in my part - I hope - having a first class degree and commendations/distinctions at GDL/LPC. I am happy with the route I took, and don't think that in the long term there will be a significant difference as my exposure to legal concepts continues, but I do not think it's fair to state that LLBs are "less than useless", certainly as a trainee I can see the benefits that my colleagues are reaping from having done an LLB.

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  • This is a welll worded debating piece. BUT
    1. Costs issues are significant to the choice
    2. The foundations laid down in a good law degree ARE very useful skills, easy to undervalue
    3.As someone practising commercial lit and employment but who has had to swop specialisms within those fields it provides confidence to swop fields within the legal sector
    4. I regularly read cases and articles. It is critical for what I do. I'm an advocate. My law degree was invaluable
    5. I loved the study of law (decades ago) and it confirmed my decision to join the profession

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  • I did the 1 year postgrad diploma and, apart from constitutional and jurisprudential aspects, found the whole thing deeply tedious as none of the statutory, caselaw and legal categories covered and crammed for were put into any kind of context (whether legal, political, social, economic, historical, or practical)...I'd like to think the full law degree gives more scope to do this..but probably not.

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  • By this rationale, it would be better to take on the sex workers with the LLBs. There would be a natural synergy when it comes to billing in £200 ph in blocks.

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  • Obviously written by someone with below-average intelligence.

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  • I think this gentleman overstates his case. Certainly being a good lawyer is not about whether you have a law degree or not. However, it is alarming how little many lawyers in this country know about the basic principles of law from jurisprudence to civil, criminal, tort, wills and probate etc. You may also note that UK non-law graduates are not automatically accepted in many jurisdictions for exams such as the New York and California Bar exams. In many common law countries, NZ, Australia, Nigeria a law degree is a must- and they make better, more grounded and more knowledgeable lawyers.

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  • After reading this ridiculous article, I can tell a couple of things about the author. First, he has not read law at university. Second, he has not practiced law. The big flaw in his argument is when he outlines all the different elements and then recommends an alternative degree. What if an aspiring practitioner wants to do all of those things outlined whilst studying for a degree. In which case, the LL.B. is the only degree that can fulfil such an aspiration. Herein lies the worth of the Law Degree. It is the culmination and the diversity of skills that can be developed where the LL.B. shines.
    On a final note, I'd love this prat to inform Oxford or Harvard that their law degree is pointless.

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  • "As a LLB student, and someone who took law at A Level, I feel get so annoyed the firms and chambers take on such a high percentage of non-law graduates.
    How can a non law graduate know that they will enjoy or excel in a career in law if they have never studied it?"
    From personal experience, I've found that firms who take on non-law graduates prefer those who've had legal work experience, thus demonstrating that they do in fact know that a career in law is what they wish to enter into.
    Also, the expense which graduates put them through to complete the GDL and then the LP/BPTC shows dedication in my opinion - they're unlikely to invest so much time and money without really considering whether this is the career that they wish to pursue....
    Most other graduate career paths don't have an associated degree, so people have no experience of those either....

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  • What a load of tosh.
    The knowledge I gained on my law degrees is something I have constantly used in practice - over 20 years.
    It is occasionally noticeable that those who have qualified through cramming their way through a conversion course have sometimes quite astonishing gaps in their legal education. It wastes my time and my clients' money having to complete these second grade practioners' legal education.
    As for never looking up a law report - how else could one understand a key judgment?

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  • Is this a bit of a sweeping accusation? Perhaps this is true of many 'traditional' law LLBs, however, there are certainly LLBs available which do teach many of the more 'practical' elements which lawyers use on an everyday basis. The relatively new York Law School is a good example of this.

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