Categories:Employment

Linklaters partner: female quotas would rub off on law firms

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  • Another April Fool'd story, methinks. Since when do magic circle outfits like Linklaters give a stuff about this sort of issue?

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  • I am personally against the quotas, but it's good to see some changes among the leading law firms.

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  • "Rabson...who has worked part-time for long periods..."

    Could this possibly be one reason why women in business are less successful at board level? Heterosexual couples comprise a man and a woman. If *either* of them chooses to leave work for a period of time, or work part-time, then their earnings, their experience, their promotion and their career will suffer. These are predictable and legitimate consequences of personal choices: first to have children, and secondly to become the primary carer for them. My understanding was that single men and women perform equally well in the workplace, i.e. once statistics are controlled for those who have children, and then choose to eschew work for childcare, the issues largely disappear. (Also, controlling for other factors such as area of work: Employment as opposed to Corporate/Banking, for example.)

    Surely the problem is that in most couples is it is the man who focuses on his career, and the woman who actively chooses to focus on childcare. If most couples decided that the man should stay at home and look after the children (with concomitant absences from work/periods of part-time work), and the woman should focus on her career, we could end "inequality" in a few short years. Is this “the only way things will change”?...

    (This would, however, require fully-sharable parental leave rather than the rather insidious status quo which grants vastly different allowances to mothers and fathers - for reasons that I can not discern, and which I would like to think might be challengeable under HRA or the Equality Act 2010. It would also require women to marry men who are prepared to leave the workplace to focus on childcare: I wonder how many men would do that?)

    Or... if we don't think that government should intervene in couples' personal decisions, then perhaps, just perhaps, the logical solution is for each individual couple to make whatever decision is right for them as to who becomes primary carer, and accept the consequences that if you spend less time working, you will not promote as fast as your peers who make different choices?

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