Eversheds top as lawyers lose out to accountants on social media

  • Print
  • Comments (11)

Readers' comments (11)

  • An irrelevant survey given lawyers and accountants don't do social media even remotely well.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Ah!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Regardless of the gap between professional services firms it's good to see firms taking online reputation/brand management so seriously. Match this with leadership, values and behaviour and culture management programmes internally and you have the makings of a serious, sustainable brand management programme.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • @Anonymous 2:43 - if they don't use social media well (and I agree), doesn't that make this survey all the more relevant?...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I find twitter accounts run by individuals (rather than the marketing dept of a firm) to be much more interesting and informative.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • What a lot of tosh. Does anyone really think that sophisticated clients are influenced by crap like Facebook, which is basically for kids and dopey housewives? They may be mildly amused by Twitter, but no way are they going to let it influence their choice of lawyer, which is, as it always has been and always will be, dictated by personal recommendation and professional reputation.

    Active promotional marketing is no doubt necessary to flog cornflakes or washing powder. All these brands are basically the same and in order to persuade gullible consumers that one identical product is better than another they have to create a brand identity. it's hardly likely to change anyone's life because they choose one brand of cornflakes over another.

    No doubt such marketing is also needed for just the same reasons by sleazy personal injury and cut price conveyancing firms, all of whom offer an equally poor service and can only compete on price. But it's completely inappropriate for a serious professional firm.

    And I do wish marketing people would stop talking in that horrible pseudo-scientific way - "Our focus is on relationships and social media allows us a degree of engagement with our key stakeholders that other channels of communication aren’t yet able to deliver." FFS, no normal person talks like this. It sounds like they know they're talking crap so have to dress it up to make it sound serious.

    And sorry ianpbuckingham, but "Match this with leadership, values and behaviour and culture management programmes internally and you have the makings of a serious, sustainable brand management programme" is just more of the same - I'll bet 10/1 that you're in marketing and not a lawyer.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Thanks for that eloquent outpouring "pro bono"! Why not put your name where your mouth is and let's have a proper debate? As amusing as your ill informed and reactionary comments are about so-called marketing speak, most people reading your diatribe will doubtless be reaching for the tissues given the legal profession could hardly be described as the home of plain speaking and brevity!
    Having facilitated a workshop or two on behalf of the Managing Partner's Forum, I can confirm that reputation management, identity, differentiation and brand are all very much at the forefront of the minds of partners at leading firms. Online media is also recognised as communication and marketing channels which, if combined with more traditional media, will help firms connect with an untapped audience, potential recruits and new markets.
    Sure, Facebook has its limitations. But there's a lot more to so-called social media than the stereotypes you're sledging in your comments. Might be worth seeing through those misconceptions as you're missing out on a phenomenon that, like it or not, isn't going to go away!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I would agree with both Pro Bono | 26-Apr-2013 5:04 pm and Anonymous | 28-Apr-2013 0:38 am. No serious client would ever make a choice regarding a legal adviser upon a social media effort (see e.g. last Martindale research). What the social media usually attracts are time-wasters of all kinds. However, potential unexperienced recruits will surely check facebook etc and that is what they for.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • @Max - I happen to work at one of the firms that did well in this survey. We use social media not just for graduate recruitment and laterals etc. A number of our clients (including ALL of those who I deal with (GCs)) would ask questions if we stopped updating our various social media feeds with updates, discussions etc...
    I wouldn't advice someone to instuct based on a firm's social media credentials. However, clients DO appreciate it as an additional resource (particularly with in-house teams). You don't give social media any credit, but maybe it's just because YOU are not able to turn it into a useful tool. I do however agree it is not a necessity.

    Yet.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • If you think that social media will never play a part in law firm selection, you've misjudged the next generation of legal services buyer.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

View results 10 per page | 20 per page

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (11)