Why the bar really is a meritocracy

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  • "The fact that life may be unfair does not mean that someone who attains a privileged position enjoyed an undue advantage. Discuss." Do let us know how you get on with GCSE Logic, Fin.

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  • Anonymous | 4-Nov-2011 5:35 pm - don't be silly, it's all the Bar's fault for accepting applications from Oxbridge graduates.
    Best,
    Tom & Fin

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  • I have to say that I find the above comments extremely disappointing. Yes life is tough and it is hard to find the job or career that you want. As a qualified Barrister there are so many opportunities out there. The self employed bar is not the only avenue. After pupillage I found a job as an in-house lawyer and earn far more than many of my colleagues at the self employed bar, enjoy company benefits such as large pension, company car and work less hour than I ever did at the bar. I also engage many of my colleagues at the bar to assist the company that I work for. I have had a hugely enjoyable experience as a in house Barrister. There are more than one way to skin a cat

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  • I have read so many disparaging comments about the publically schooled that I wanted to point out something that only a state comprehensive-educated person like myself can say. The reason they succeed in this field is not through genetics or contacts. The simple and sad fact is that public schools teach individuals to excel and speak out. By contrast state schools make you learn to keep your head down. Until that changes, the bar wont.

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  • It has changed and for quite some time, many state schools do teach individuals to excel and speak out.

    However, many making the decisions in the bar are still tethered to the good old public school must be better attitude, as this discussion has shown.

    No wonder there is a continued strong belief the bar looks to the same old types of faces and backgrounds it has always done with some lip service and tokenism for appearances sake.

    This author of this article has a poor understanding of statistics as well as a lamentable ability to persuade anyone of the strength of her argument who is already not firmly rooted in her camp. It seems the interview process failed miserably in the authors case.

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