Hourly billing 'incentivises inefficiency', says Neuberger

  • Print

Readers' comments (25)

  • The logic of Lord N's argument must be that the greater the hourly fee the greater the incentive. So one might assume Lord Grabiner should be the least efficient lawyer around. Something I don't think he'd take kindly to.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • By incentivising slow work and bad practices my opinion is that you are putting the most talented and capable lawyers at a disadvantage in a law firm whith regards to remuneration and progression. very demoralising!!! Law firms should wake up and reduce the number of talented lawyers they lose.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Interesting responses. But the profession (and I use that word in its loosest sense) only has itself to blame. If we remember our duties to our clients in dealing with cases (not just litigation cases) and give full transparency as to what we are doing for them, and why and what it will cost then then there should be no need for such comments from the judiciary and if there are comments they would be the exception rather than perceived as the rule. Law firms are being seen as an easy target because theyhave set themselves up as such for what has gone on in the past. There is no problem in law firms arguing that they have a business to run but at the same time they must remember that they serve the client (and until I retire I will never think of a client as a customer). How this is resolved only time will tell but perhaps it might help if law firms were seen to be less interested in publicising profits per partner so that everyone can go back to slating fat cat bankers!!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Interesting views already. From a clients’ perspective, after spending 10 years previously working for a number of law firms, there is a constant requirement to be able to demonstrate value versus cost. There are already a number of invoicing solutions available to clients, be it fixed, conditional, abortive, hourly or menu/scale pricing etc. The article is best looked at as a challenge to law firms to show that there is a place for hourly charging, but, perhaps, law firms need to articulate or demonstrate more clearly to their clients the advantages of such a model, as in some cases applying an hourly model does offer better value, control and visibility.
    Form a clients side, been able to compare options on pricing against competing legal providers can only usually be achieved by looking at Fixed Fee offerings (to keep Procurement happy). The danger of comparing Partner headline rates is evident in the delivery of transactions, as a Law firm offering 20% lower Partner rates, may cost more if the transaction is delivered 90% by Partners. Pricing comparisons can be made by producing leverage by grade by transaction type, but this relies on finding a sample source of similar transactions and assumptions across providers, and is heavily compromised.
    This discussion will run on, I’m sure, personally, when deciding on which legal provider to use, it is a case that panels are set up to provide a ‘best in class’ provision for a variety of legal needs varying from volume low risk to high risk M&A activity, where using the same provider is not an option.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Utter stuff and nonsense from Neuberger MR - the true cost pressure comes from the clients anyway, not from the judiciary.
    Firms are under enormous pressure to deliver more for less at the moment, supported by big write-offs, discounted hourly rates and stringent staged fee caps.
    Quite frankly it is reaching a situation where solicitors are hamstrung from researching or reviewing documents as much as they would like to, and are having to work harder than ever to maintain quality without breaching fee estimates.
    More proof (as if any were needed) that the judiciary is out of touch with the realities of modern practice.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • @ Mr Clementi - I don't want to put words into warrior's mouth but I think that is precisely the point he was making - you have the choice to use a different law firm if you don't like what his offers. Why should all firms be forced to offer fixed fee? Let the market decide!

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Solicitors love hourly billing but clients hate it. Unless a fee cap is in place, the fees are totally unpredictable and the solicitors are positively incentivised to be as inefficient as possible.
    I do wonder how long hourly rates will remain the norm. Other professional service providers such as accountants have long abandoned hourly rateas for much of their work. I think it is only a matter of time. As solicitors we may not like what Lord Neuberger says, but he is right.
    I would like to see greater use of fixed fees. With a fee cap, the lawyer takes risk but the client will still benefit if the matter is smaller than expected. With a fixed fee, the client and lawyer share the risks either way.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • What other topics are there for the keynote speaker at the Association of Costs Lawyers conference? Oh, there are none...

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Hourly rates do serve a useful purpose in focussing the client's mind on using their lawyer's time efficiently and commercially. Unless the solicitor concerned is able to decline to act, hourly charging helps dissuade those litigants who are pursuing vexatious claims/defending the indefensible ones. This is mentioned with the proviso that the solicitors are provding appropriate costs information at all times. If this latter point is what truly concerns Lord Neuberger, then attacking hourly charges in isolation is going to miss the point.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • There's no doubt that the billable hour and other typical law firm performance measures can be counter-productive. But for all the noise, many clients still prefer it over other options because it is easy to compare and implement.
    Value being a very difficult thing to judge (in advance) for a fixed cost business like a law firm, almost all alternative fee options are based on an hourly rate anyway. The ability to offer a cap or fix presupposes that their is enough certainty in the case to perform such calculations - an easily defined scope, understood variables, no unforeseen glitches etc. And in a contentious situation that is a very difficult situation to reach.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

View results 10 per page | 20 per page | 50 per page

  • Print