LSB to quiz all lawyers on parents’ education

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  • Maybe the better question for lawyers when looking at social mobility shouldn't be about where their parents attended university but whether or not their parents attended university.

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  • Why should where your parents go to university have any bearing on how good you are as a lawyer? This is a ridiculous waste of time and effort by the LSB. Parental university choice is only one factor in a child's education. It's a sledgehammer to crack a nut.

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  • @middleclassandproudof it
    I think you've missed the point of this initiative. As I understand it, this is a monitoring exercise rather than a prescriptive initiative which will scare the Daily Mail. I for one will be very interested in seeing whether all the diversity credentials of the big City firms will stand up under class scrutiny, especially the Magic Circle. I hope that the LSB will also be asking lawyers whether they were schooled in the state or independent sectors and how that plays out at Partner level.

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  • Presumably we will have the option of ticking a box that says "It's none of your business"?

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  • My parents never went to university, neither did my older siblings but I did.
    This is all about class indication, encouraging those from lower class background to move up the social hierarchy.
    My question is whether this will actually help improve anything or whether it could be open to abuse? What about if firms refuse to take part? Will the LSB name and shame?
    Firms are doing a lot more to encourage social diversity, but a lot more needs to be done. This move, while admirable, is a drop in the ocean

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  • City law firms are full of very average (and frequently, not very nice) people . The number of truly 'exceptional' individuals in City firms is very low and in truth they often don't do well as they make others feel threatened.
    The work of a City lawyer generally requires an IQ of no more than 110, and little or no creativity, originality or insight.
    Most of those very average City lawyers have close relatives who are lawyers, business owners, accountants etc. There should be a simple rule: you cannot become a City lawyer if any close relative fits into one of these categories.
    Such a rule will have zero impact on the output of the firms, but a drastic one on social mobility.

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  • I echo this:
    "Presumably we will have the option of ticking a box that says "It's none of your business"?"

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  • The one good thing about the current situation is that it concentrates a large amount of unpleasant people in one profession, thereby limiting the amount of contact that the rest of the population need have with them.

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  • This plan to improve "social diversity" appears to overlook the possibility that if both parents went to uni they might just have more able and intelligent children. It is therefore inevitable that those children will be over represented in the more academic professions, such as the law.
    The only way to reverse this would be to discriminate against those children on the grounds of who there parents were, rather judging them on merit. I thought that this sort of discrimination was precisely what we were trying to avoid

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  • How does this assist in monitoring social mobility today?
    Neither of my parents went to university but I am a white middle class male who went to public school and I now work in a top 10 firm.
    All it demonstrates is that my parents moved up the social ladder before I started school and long before anyone cared about whether law firms were sufficiently diverse.

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