Linklaters says: take a BlackBerry break

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Readers' comments (21)

  • Sceptical

    For me, real relaxation is when you get to think about something completely different for a while. Leaving your Blackberry behind might be a worthwhile gesture, but ultimately the firm still expects its associates to be contact-able to answer questions about work when they are away. That is the real problem - not having a Blackberry might simply make that contact a little less convenient.

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  • clueless

    Since when? I work at Linklaters and have never heard of this new policy!

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  • Strategic thinking

    This is good strategic thinking on behalf of Linklaters. WIth tough times ahead, the firm has obviously considered the fact that associate pay freezes are likely. Accordingly then, they are seeking to do things that will make associates value their jobs but don't cost the firm money. Expect others to follow.

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  • clueless

    I hadn't heard about it either but spoke to one of the partners and they said it came in about a month ago.
    Not that it's going to make any difference as you still have to have your mobile phone on!

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  • Probably costs-saving...

    I think it's more to do with the costs associated with everyone checking their personal e-mails, Facebook account and surfing the web whilst abroad - I'm sure that's not cheap to fund in these 'credit-crunching' times!

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  • Put in their place

    It's very clever. Linklaters' way of saying "Memento mori" to the triumphal associates. In a quieter market, they should be made to realise that they are dispensable. (And since associates desperately look at their Blackberries every 2 minutes to gauge how important they are, maybe it isn't such a bad thing).

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  • Use a Sole Practitioner instead

    Clients use nice big law firms because they can get a continuous level of service regardless of who is on holiday. If the law firm cant let associates have real holidays, the clients may as well save the cost of employing a mega-firm and just use use a sole practitioner who takes his communications everywhere anyway

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  • Cheaper insurance?

    A number of banks and investment managers get cheaper PI insurance by requiring staff to stay out of touch with the office for an uninterrupted 14 day period.

    There has recently been discussion about whether Blackberry usage breaks this rule - and the advice was 'yes it does' (you cannot trade from it but you can instruct on trades etc). I wonder if this is all a cost saving measure?

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  • Got to be cost-savings

    930 lawyers at Silk Street and a good proportion would normally be away in relatively exotic locations with the Blackberry for some portion of the summer - do the maths.

    Being mid-2 live deals two summers ago whilst sailing cost my firm over £500! If you'd added keeping up-to-speed with the test matches, the bill would have been even worse. Far more cost-effective to delegate the work to those back at base who aren't at full capacity.

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  • Roaming charges

    Perhaps Linklaters has been looking at its mobile bills and has seen how much they spend on roaming charges which may or may not be for personal use! The credit crunch really is affecting everyone.

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