Linklaters opens summer vacation schemes to non-law students

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  • But why didn't they study law in the first place if they're so interested by a legal career ? That's because of them that law students can't find TCs !!!!!

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  • Stop whining and divert your energies to the ceaseless pursuit of grammatical accuracy.

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  • @hello, I am not sure why a decision made aged 17 regarding degree subject matter should preclude you from a career in law, if that is what someone decides whilst at university. Its for the same reason law graduates can enter into a variety of non-legal fields if they want to following graduation.

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  • The CPE route into the profession is pretty well-established. So the only surprising thing to me is that Linklaters weren't offering vac schemes to non-law graduates years ago - is this a city firm thing?

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  • @Hello - I wanted to be a lawyer from my early teens. I chose not to study law as my first degree on the basis that there were subjects I loved at A-Level that I wanted to learn more of before starting my career and the conversion course was open to me. I loved my degree, I loved my legal studies afterwards and I'm now a qualified lawyer. No one should be obliged to decide what they want to do with their career at 17 or be penalised for not having made that decision earlier or on the assumption that chosing not to study only law from the age of 18 has something to do with their commitment to being a lawyer.

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  • Will Links now be opening up their non-law Vac Scheme to law students? It seems only fair, seeing as competition has now been increased for law students.

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  • Links would be a good place to flush out those who aren't 100% committed to a career in law...

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  • @ anonymous 1.40 pm. Seconded. Best advice I ever got (from a lawyer - for free!!) was do something else you're interested in at Uni; you've a whole working career to get to grips with the law.

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  • As a law graduate, who knew at 17 that I wanted to be a lawyer and studied a law degree accordingly, I find it a little annoying that somebody who did, say, a degree in English, could then compress a law degree-lite into 12 months and then wade in to compete with me for the job I've been preparing an extra 3 years for.


    The concept also devalues the legal profession to some extent, given that the message is: "you can study to be a lawyer in only two years". Optometrist, dentists etc can't do a GDL equivalent in medicine to become GPs (they have to do a full medical degree despite already knowing large amounts about medicine), so why should anybody with any old degree be able to become a lawyer after only 2 years' legal study?


    Whilst I'm not denying that very many good lawyers come from non-law degree backgrounds, there are undoubtedly a large number of equally able potential lawyers from law degree backgrounds who are unable to get a job due to these extra competitors who have studied the law for only 2 years, and who now seem to enjoy treatment on a par with positive discrimination. That strikes me as a little unjust.


    For the record, I secured a TC despite my boring and old fashioned law degree background.

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  • This is just cost cutting. The reason the winter scheme was for non law students is that it was timed better for the application process for TCs. Yet again more cynical spin from Links.

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  • He's been pedanted. Send him the t shirt.

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  • Anonymous | 19-Jul-2012 1:06 pm

    The CPE route into the profession is pretty well-established. So the only surprising thing to me is that Linklaters weren't offering vac schemes to non-law graduates years ago - is this a city firm thing?

    The winter scheme that the article mentions is scrapped was aimed at final year non-law students. This is thus no big news, instead of having a dedicated winter scheme for non-lawyers, Links have merely done a reshuffling of their timetable.

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  • Surely the law degree/conversion discussion depends on the branch of law being looked into.
    When I (working in IT contracts,) require a solicitor I would want them to have a detailed understanding of the law to ensure there were no holes, now imagine if you are dealing with a Chemicals deal or contract, a wide breadth of knowledge would be useless if they didn’t understand the fundamentals of the deal. For a criminal barrister on the other hand, having an in-depth knowledge of another field is likely inferior to a strong breadth of law learning.

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  • I know this is going to start a storm but here I go. The reason law students who have been preparing for career in law are annoyed (yes, annoyed) with non-law students coming in a sweeping away spots is because it is significantly harder to secure a first in law than in another subject. I studied International Relations and then did a full 3 year course in law and honestly it is a lot easier to perform better in other humanities subjects. Also, many law schools are known for being too harsh on the grading and the professors do not hide the fact that there is a quota for high marks and once that quota is filled, the external examiners will cut, cut, cut them down.

    Furthermore, the interview for non-law students is a bit different because you are not asked about cases and why you loved contract law so much, for example.

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  • I completely degree with 10.43am comment. I know people who have done non-law subjects and achieved Firsts far easier than those who do law. But now the legal market doesn't care if you do law or, tbh, even what subject you decide to do. It seems I could go and do a subject sooo far removed from law, but as long as I get a 2:1 or 1 I will be considered by a firm. But if I push myself and do a law degree, and scrape a high 2:2 or low 2:1, I am not good enough.

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  • @Anon 10:57
    Not all of us convertors did "easier" humanities courses though. Some of us decided to do an engineering degree before converting. My advantage is I understand what my clients are talking about when I'm taking instructions on a dispute and can challenge their thinking or version of events from a technical standpoint - I'm not sure someone from a straight through law background can do the same (well, not without a significant number of years PQE experience)
    So stop griping, you may not like it but the fact remains you can practice law successfully without an undergraduate degree, you made your choice and us convertors made ours.

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  • Of course not all are 'easier' - I think the point that person is making is why do universities even bother having law degrees anymore. Surely corporate firms should start insisting that students need a strong degree subject in something that will give them a good commercial awareness. What is the point doing a law degree?

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  • Ludicrous comments from law students. Here's the clear reality, from a City lawyer - nothing you learn on your law degree is of any use to a City firm. Nothing you learn on your GDL or LPC is either. You're simply a document monkey. Law firms need reasonably bright people to man the pumps in the due diligence rooms, not academic lawyers. Do something interesting; at least you'll have a hinterland of more interesting chat to have with your fellow trainees at midnight.

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