Law Soc calls for LPC entrance test

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  • The problem, and the reason why many people do not get training contracts is NOT because of their ability. There are plenty of people with ABA and a strong 2:1 at Law schools, who still cannot get a training contract and there are also many bright candidates who just do not understand the application process- how to complete a solid application, interview technique, where to look for work experience opportunities and even some students who lack the positive and ambitious attitutde needed to secure a training contract.

    Restricting the LPC so that only those 'bright' enough are eligible for a study place will NOT remove the problem of too many applicants v training contracts available.

    The pass rate of the LPC is pretty high, meaning that most people who take it actually pass anyway!

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  • LPC providers should interview candidates who are applying to study the LPC.

    In the interview they should discuss the applicants aims, ambitions, and understanding of the whole solicitor process. The LPC providers should then inform the student of the competitive odds and provide a realistic picture of the current recruitment market. The applicant can then decide whether they wish to pursue with their £10k

    Too many students fall into the trap of taking the LPC, just because they did a law degree and think they might like to be a lawyer. Or because they think you can apply, and get a training contract just like that once you have finished the LPC.

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  • A very interesting idea but not one that the LPC providers will consider unless legally compelled to as it's in their interests to keep filling seats and taking fees.

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  • A far better idea would be to regulate admission to the LPC so that everyone who gets onto it will get a TC.

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  • How about being really radical and, say, ban people commencing the LPC until they had secured a training contract? That, or scrap the whole thing and replace it with firm-centred legal education?

    Frankly, the whole thing looks like a knee-jerk reaction against the fact that the Law Society has abysmally failed to regulate the market for legal education.

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  • As a solicitor I am ashamed of the SRA. This is just another way to control the legal profession and keep the pie for certain people. Not surprising at all.

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  • This is another example of a piecemeal approach to legal education. What we really need is a wholesale review. Such a test is going to make it increasing difficult for students from poorer backgrounds to break into the legal profession. I think it's appalling - who is running legal education the Law Society or the SRA?

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  • It would be ridiculous to restrict the LPC to those who have secured training contracts.

    Many students secure training contracts during and shortly after their LPC and lots of smaller firms and in-house departments recruit on an ad hoc basis, favouring students who have already completed their LPC.

    I think that everyone should be able to take the LPC, but should do so having a full and a clear view of their chances of securing a training contract. This would be best done via the suggestion above, that the LPC providers should interview applicants.

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  • Just require all applicants to have a 2:1 from a Russel Group university, four or more A levels at A grade or higher from public, private or grammar school and a southern accent.

    Sorted.

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  • Speaking as one of those who has completed the LPC and had no luck yet securing a training contract, in retrospect I agree with the poster above who says LPC providers should discuss in depth with LPC applicants the nature of the legal recruitment market and the hurdles to be overcome. Admittedly the recession hit after I had already committed myself to the LPC, but even so such a frank discussion would have been extremely helpful. The schools are never going to do that, though. They need the fees.

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