Improved retention rates give law graduates a fillip

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  • There is a very thin line between optimism and wilful ignorance here. There are less jobs, with lower retention rates than pre-recession (albiet slowly rebounding) with a correspondingly greater number of law graduates, and within those law graduates a gradual inflation of degree pass mark. There are far too many optimistic students and graduates in comparison to the number of places. To spend 4 years plus training contract, and an easy 50k including student debt doing an LLB + LPC (or 65k+ 5 years for non-law converts!) in the hope of joining tens of thousands of others with similar qualifications is more reckless than optimistic.
    Of course the impact of such a massive investment will be felt more by your prospective first generation lawyer required to self fund than by those with parents who have been there done that got the t-shirt.
    Yes there are jobs for the 'right candidate' but that will involve far more than demonstrating basic academic competence. Law firms, particularly larger city ones, have their pick of dozens of suitable candidates, and assuming the best will leave many out in the cold when interviews assessment days etc are done and dusted.
    Clearly if the legal profession is where you want to go then you'll do it no matter what, but it's much better to go into it eyes wide open than pretending everything is rosy.

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  • Arrogance and ignorance are more likely than optimism when it comes to the reason for these results.
    Law students are not as intelligent, business minded and proactive as they like to claim to be.

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  • I get somewhat confused with the "time" and resources required to become a lawyer. I spent a total of 6 years training for my career (4 years BBA plus 2 years MBA in the USA), and simply expect that this grind was a required pathway. I then spent 6 more years in "practice" to become a Brand Manager of a major brand in the UK. My budget responsibility is over 6 million pounds and I make 70K (which I am delighted to make, and don't complain). Why do young lawyers expect to put in less time training (4 years), yet not have massive responsibility (not millions of pounds under direct control), and make 200-300K a year. Part of the problem is the unrealistic belief that Law is a goldmine for-a blessed plot for those with an LLB. Of course, every student possible will aim for such a "dream" profession.

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