Ilex rebuts study saying legal execs get raw deal

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  • To those who belttle F.Inst.L.Ex. please continue to do so and lull yoruself into a false sense of security that you are more superior than us.
    It makes it more fun when you get turned over by us.

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  • "please continue to do so and lull yoruself into a false sense of security that you are more superior than us" [sic]
    I was of the impression that one is either 'superior' or 'inferior' - can one be 'more superior'?
    Shurely shome mishtake?
    furthermore, how exactly would one be 'turned over'?

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  • Why are legal executives always so chippy?
    PS Paralegals are now the third branch of the legal profession.

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  • "As a legal executive lawyer who has studied a law degree, the LPC, the ILEX course and even the CLC course I can absolutely, categorically say that the ILEX course is completely on a par with the degree/LPC route"
    If you had to do the ILEX as well as an LLB+LPC, one questions the standards by which you are comparing them all.
    I have seen an ILEX paper and know many legal execs. Whilst it probably does put them on a par with the lower end of the LLB scale, it is hardly the same level as what you would expect to get into, say, a city firm.
    Legal execs have their place, alongside paralegals, as a legitimate branch of the profession, but the suggestion that they are equivalent in the entry level and training as most solicitors is fanciful.

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  • Passionate lobbying from those who have studied ILEX.

    I would be more convinced if I had met a Legal Exec who was a partner in a Top 20 law firm.

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  • I can possibly offer some authority on this subject as I practice as a Solicitor having previously practiced as a Legal Executive!! To be fair, the ILEX qualification is no walk in the park and I believe it is degree standard. There is a focus on your chosen area of practice which makes sense. However, there are some considerable gaps in the academic and practice papers. By way of example, there was absolutely no reference to Solicitors Accounts Rules when I sat the ILEX exams. I therefore practiced for almost a decade without any real knowledge of those rules which only came to light when I was completing my LPC which I undertook on a part time basis whilst working as a Legal Executive.
    Solicitors have no right to "look down" on a legitimate member of our profession. I do beleive Solicitors are better qualififed and more rounded as Lawyers but that should not detract from the competent and considerable work being underatken by Legal Executives in offices up and down the Country.

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  • If their is no difference, please tell me why on earth (when armed with the knowledge that ILEX qualified lawyers are paid significantly less and face the prospect of snobbery and a very low glass ceiling) would one choose to qualify through ILEX rather than as a solicitor? Genuine question!
    There are so many ridiculous comments on this thread, but my favourite has to be:
    Anonymous | 2-Mar-2011 12:51 pm
    "...the following is true and should benefit the ILEX group...solicitors salaries are falling and will continue to fall. Most other jobs now pay a lot more."
    What an absolute load of rubbish! I am a solicitor in my twenties and earn more than 3x the national average salary. I know lawyers at my same level in other firms who earn more like 5x or 6x the national average salary. I am not saying that being a lawyer is ever going to make you a millionaire, but to claim that "most other jobs pay a lot more" suggests that somebody needs a reality check!

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  • "As a legal executive lawyer who has studied a law degree, the LPC, the ILEX course and even the CLC course I can absolutely, categorically say that the ILEX course is completely on a par with the degree/LPC route"
    It is clear from this comment that the "degree/LPC route" you took, which you say is comparable to the ILEX route, was not undertaken at one of this country's leading universities. Otherwise, you would not have needed to embark upon both the degree/LPC and ILEX routes. This is because had you studied your law degree at one of the country's leading universities initially, you would not have needed to go through ILEX. In which case, your categorical statement is flawed. Your law degree must have been undertaken at a non-traditional (i.e. crap) university.
    I completed the LLB at Bristol and it was far, far, FAR harder than the LPC. Fellow LPC students who attended so-called "lesser" universities found the LPC to be a step UP in difficulty. That to me signified that the degree they undertook was less rigorous.
    Ex-polytechnic graduates, ILEX folk and the like can harp on about how their education was just as rigorous all they like. The fact is, you lot failed to rise to the top at the crucial point in life - age 18. You lot failed to secure a Training Contract, one of the toughest legal tests out there. Whilst I have no doubt that there are a minority of exceptional legal executives, the fact is that the top firms in this country contain a minority of non-exceptional solicitors. Therein lies the crucial differential.
    For the record, I am not a spoon-fed-son-of-rich-parents-with-contacts. I am a working class Welsh countryside boy. So don't use the "glass ceiling" as an excuse.

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  • I wouldn't worry about the comments of the first poster. People like that are likely to be wiped out of the legal profession with the advent of ABSs. Big investors won't care a damn what you're called, or you call yourself, provided you can do the work. That is the way it should be and is in professions like investment banking and IT that are arguably doing more to shape the modern world.
    The legal profession as a whole needs to get with the times. The modern legal practice should put its dusty books and paper files in the bin, start investing in modern technology, obtain external investment and seek out the best talent regardless of their qualifications or so-called status.

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  • "The modern legal practice should put its dusty books and paper files in the bin, start investing in modern technology, obtain external investment and seek out the best talent regardless of their qualifications or so-called status."
    I agree. After, who really wants a solicitor with a decent academic record, City training and years of PQE when any johnny-on-the-spot who fancies a punt can have a go?
    In fact, let's go further. I'd be perfectly happy to have brain surgery conducted by a fast-track apprentice from a former Poly - wouldn't you?
    If ILEX provides such quality, depth and breadth of legal education and experience, why do so many ILEX candidates push on to try to qualify as solicitors?
    It is a different branch of the profession, with different (read: lower) entry standards.

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