If you want to head a goliath, be called David

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  • What tosh. Obviously "traditional white, middle-class names” are going to be prevalent in any large sample of British professionals. It doesn't make having such a name more likely to lead to being a partner at all.
    Derek Klyhn's comment assigns causality where there is none, and thus displays a total ignorance of the basic principles of research.
    You may as well say: "Our survey discovered that most lawyers have brown hair - therefore dye your hair brown if you want to be a lawyer."
    Complete idiocy.

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  • This must be the most ridiculous piece of research ever carried out, who cares about a name as long as you can do the job, surely that is of utmost importance.

    @ CityGent - snob, I bet you're named Wayne

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  • @ Traycee
    If your name is indeed a version of `Traycee' I fully understand your sensitivity!
    Not surprisingly absent from the list of female names, along with your natural twin, Sharon.

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  • Benny, maybe you're taking it all a bit too seriously. I imagine it's just supposed to be an amusing little piece. But perhaps The Lawyer could do some research on whether you have to have a sense of humour to become a partner.

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  • @ City Gent

    I assume that as you are trying to score points on grammar and insulting people based on class that you're one of these new money types who thinks an education from a minor public school makes you something?

    People like you ultimately fail because they're too arrogant to notice their faults. It is very entertaining watching the demise though.

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  • I helped Derek interpret the data and want to come to his defence as regards his light-hearted/ironic comment on names (which was clearly far too ironic for some of the commentators here!)
    The incidence of names was not the main focus of the research, but an amusing side-bar, which has caught the headlines. The main article in the Lawyer drew attention to the main point of interest, which was the gender-split as regards age of resignations and average working 'life' at the top firms.
    Unfortunately - and such is the peril of online - the two pieces are not linked on this site, and the other piece is difficult to access, but I would recommend you read it. Here's the link:
    http://www.thelawyer.com/revealed-top-uk-firms-make-poor-showing-in-female-partner-stakes/1005590.article
    The main piece has also been picked up by womeninlaw.com
    Lawyer guys/gals, if you're reading this, can you stick the link at the bottom of this article so that people can read the main piece? Ta!

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  • My name is Michael and I am a lawyer.
    My grandson Andrew will commence his LLB studies in London this year.

    I must however confess I don't share the views of the research-rather put the money to better use.

    As for the royal baby -lets hope its James Albert.

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  • By whose definition are David, Michael, Richard, Sarah, Catherine, Susan or Helen middle class names? As David Morley correctly observes, David is a popular name for blokes of his generation, but this is precisely BECAUSE it was class neutral. (Christopher is another favourite of that time for the same reason, although didn't appear here). Elizabeth and Simon are debatable, I suggest, but there are plenty of Lizs who aren't posh.

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