Fusion by the back door?

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  • I disagree, most people opt for the LPC as it is cheaper and everyone is fully aware of the intense competition at the bar. Becoming a Solicitor is generally more viable. I took my LPC whilst always fully intent on becoming a Higher-Rights Advocate.

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  • Tobias, author's making point that someone will opt for BPTC if wishing to be an advocate "above all else." Solicitor-advocate is still first and foremost a solicitor, not a full-time advocate. Opting to train as solicitors just because competition is slightly lower than for the bar does not seem like the best reason. Do solicitor-advocates handle more or less advocacy than barristers? I'm sure it must be less or all barristers would be switching to get the steady salary, right?

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  • There will always be the need for *advocates* but not *barristers.* A fused profession can work if lawyers who are good advocates simply spend most time in court than those who are better at other things.

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  • Alex, totally disagree. I wanted to be an advocate above all else, but couldn't afford the Bar. I've always been clear in my ambitions and began my experience in general litigation and county court advocacy with some limited High Court experience too, to prep for my Higher Rights. My professional skills element of my training contract will include the Higher Rights course and upon completion I can get my Higher Rights of Audience where I will work in a department dealing almost exclusively with advocacy.

    Kate hits the nail on the head.

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