Hip hop on the Trott

3.06pm
The courts just can’t get enough of LA rapper Snoop Dogg, otherwise known as Calvin Broadus Jr. But it’s not his songs that they’re after.


Hip hop on the Trott5 February, 3.06pm

The courts just can’t get enough of LA rapper Snoop Dogg, otherwise known as Calvin Broadus Jr. But it’s not his songs that they’re after.

Snoop’s long-running immigration saga has been pinging back and forth between the High Court and the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal (AIT).

At the end of last year the Court of Appeal reopened the case, and there will be another hearing at the AIT as to whether Snoop’s presence in the UK could cause a civil disturbance.

Snoop’s case is complicated slightly by a bit of a ruckus involving the police, British Airways receptionists and his 30-strong security team at Heathrow airport. BA called the police when Snoop and his entourage tried to get into the business lounge in Heathrow.

Snoop’s lawyer, Phillip Trott at Bates Wells & Braithwaite has seen it all before.

He represents other rapper clients such as Busta Rhymes and 50 Cent on their immigration issues, even facing down armed police in the line of duty for Rhymes last year.

Trott is currently collecting evidence to support Snoop’s case that the ruckus, which saw the rapper led away in handcuffs, was prompted by the actions of the police rather than Snoop’s security team.

Still the question at hand is whether Snoop could incite some sort of gang warfare on the streets of London town just by being in the UK. The word ‘could’ is key here. A hypothetical scenario is going to be difficult to prove either way in a court of law.