High Court reveals identity of stalker barrister

Common law set 12 King’s Bench Walk barrister Lincoln Crawford has been named as the recorder convicted of harassing his ex-wife and new partner.

Common law set 12 King’s Bench Walk (12KBW) barrister Lincoln Crawford has been named as the recorder convicted of harassing his ex-wife and new partner.

Crawford’s identity had been kept secret by a gagging order because he had successfully argued that publicity would be harmful to his two children. The High Court last Friday (8 February), however, overturned the injunction.

The recorder was charged in September 2005 for stalking his former wife Bronwen Jenkins, an Irwin Mitchell partner and her boyfriend Dominic Buttimore.

He continued to sit as a part-time judge until February 2006, according to the Judicial Communications Office.

Crawford was then convicted at Highbury magistrates’ court in May 2006 and given a conditional discharge for 18 months but persuaded the magistrates that a gagging order should be put in place to protect his identity.

The High Court, however, ruled that the anonymity order should never have been made.

Lord Justice Thomas, sitting alongside Mrs Justice Dobbs, held: “There is no evidence of any particular harm to these children, other than the considerable embarrassment that may be felt in the playground and elsewhere over the fact that their father has been convicted of a criminal offence.”

Crawford, a former member of the Parole Board and the Commission for Racial Equality married Jenkins in June 1999. They divorced in 2004 in “highly acrimonious” circumstances, the court heard, after Jenkins had embarked on an affair with another solicitor at her firm.

The barrister left the marriage with 29 per cent of the value of the marital home – about £400,000 and non-molestation orders were made against him.

The court was told that after the divorce, Crawford became obsessed with his former wife’s new relationship.

In one instance, the court heard, the barrister followed the couple and used a boat moored in the canal behind the marital home to spy on them. While in July 2005 Crawford burst into the house at 4am, took photographs and accused the couple of having sex in front of their children.

Miles Bennett of 5 Paper Buildings who was instructed as counsel for the Crown, said that the anonymity order should be lifted otherwise it would be open to abuse by others. “Barristers and part-time judges with children today, politicians tomorrow: where does it end?” Bennett said.

Anthony Hudson of Doughty Street Chambers was instructed by The Times to lift the gagging order.