Olivia Nairn

Guide to the Inns of Court

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  • Why should a pub or inn be regarded as a place to make laws or to that profession. I have read somewhere years ago that 'ings' were historically places of council, not specifically of Noblemen. i.e. It could be villagers decide to build a bridge, improve a road or earthwork or arrannge war defences etc. Places like Nottingham derived the name from Snott's town of Council. Thus :- It should really be ' Ings of Court'

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  • "Why should a pub or inn be regarded as a place to make laws or to that profession." Inn does not mean 'Pub' here. The Inns were the town residences of Noblemen or Bishops and Inn means somewhere where you live. There were also Inns at Oxford, being similar to Halls, which also provided accommodation and teaching for the university. So 'ing' would not be appropriate here. Nor did the Inns of Court ever exercise government functions.

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