Gift of the gab

  • Print
  • Comments (4)

Readers' comments (4)

  • That should just donate and get their tax receipt. No boasting.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Organisations that give should 'shout' about it, simply because it encourages others to do the same. If someone came around your office now with a collection and no-one gave, you might not feel bad for not giving yourself. But if everyone else gave, you would be embarassed by being the only that didn't.
    That said, however, it's important to distinguish giving for giving's sake, or giving because someone wants to run the marathon, do a parachute jump or go on holiday and is asking you to sponsor them for the purpose. That's a hugely inefficient means of charity giving, in which the cost of the activity has to be born by the charity before any donations reach the needy.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • I am a City lawyer and also a trustee of a legal advice charity and Slaughters have for years been far and away the most supportive and generous of the (many) City firms we work with and we are very happy that their support and generosity should be publicised.
    On a more general point, I see the picture from both sides - from inside extremely profitable firms with millionaire partners and also, with my trustee hat on, making difficult decisions about whether we can afford to retain experienced legal advisors on salaries which are less than the secretaries, let alone the trainees, in my firm take home. It is disheartening to beg law firms for donations for months and months and this will become increasingly competitive with the imminent disappearance of legal aid for most civil matters (which means that legal advice charities will lose a very significant portion of their current funding).
    Is it right that one part of the profession has to spend so much time going cap in hand to the other with months of entreaties often yielding less than 2 hours of one partner's billable time? Of course I am extremely grateful to those firms which contribute anything at all (many do not) but I do wonder whether there is a case for a levy on commercial firms (maybe £50 per fee earner each year) which goes towards supporting the charitable legal advice sector. It may seem unfair that law firms are expected to step into a funding void left by government cuts, especially at a time when profits are under pressure from many forces, but as a profession we need to continue representing the poor, vulnerable and disenfranchised as well as the banks, companies and hedge funds. Moderate, consistent giving by way of a levy that the legal advice charities could rely on would save all parties a lot of wasted time and effort and would bring some stability to the sector.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Very interesting article, and a very shrewd use of statistics to back up the argument. In the second paragraph for example, if the top 10 give 5 million, then why does it matter what the top 100 earned? I'm more interested in what the top 10 earned, as that's where the first figures coming from. Just saying.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (4)