Get yourself connected

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  • As a fellow legal graduate recruiter, I think the idea of creating a social network for future trainees and employees is a strong idea and something I’m keen to pursue. There really are clear visible benefits to applying social media to our internal workings, however it never fails to amaze me the amount of hot air surrounding social media and attracting students. One such site mentioned above (BraveNewTalent) is a glowing example of this. Success in my view is generally based on user numbers and members, both of which it lacks hugely despite being everywhere right now. Having investigated it thoroughly and discussed it with many students, our conclusion this end is pure smoke and mirrors.

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  • I don't entirely agree with the above regarding sites such as Brave New Talent.

    As a university student I think that ventures such as BNT can create a platform for the firms to interact with potential candidates on a purely professional level. With enough publicity from relevant media (such as L2B) students are then free to join these communities and represent themselves in a professional capacity. I would personally be more comfortable with this than having to constantly monitor my personal interaction with peers through facebook etc through fear of giving the wrong impression of my professional self to a graduate recruitment team.

    Seeing magic circle law firms "connecting" with the youth on facebook always has an element of watching your dad try to be "hip" and "with it" when your mates are about... it's just not natural.

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  • I completely agree about magic circle firms “connecting” with the youth on facebook not being natural, however this is not the point I was raising concerning why sites such as BNT haven’t and won’t work. Firstly, firms don’t have time to ‘interact’ online with students. If I was to list my day-to-day tasks the very idea of sitting down once a week (or even a fortnight or month) to chat online with potential candidates would be both an impossibility and a ridiculous use of resources. Why? My programme is already heavily (and I mean heavily) oversubscribed and I’m getting the right people via current methods (which require little or no input on my part). Would students prefer to interact with us via a social network? I think BNT alone has proved this is not the case (even in an apparently professional environment). Students don’t want to be our ‘mates’, they want a job. More to the point, 2-3 people (my grad team) communicating with 10-15,000 people (the number of students our marketing campaign probably reaches each year) is called advertising, not interaction. The logistics of it alone mean it simply can’t work (and hasn’t).

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