Four New Square pupil reprimanded by BSB after drug arrest

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  • Carrying drugs does not simply demonstrate bad judgement - it makes the carrier guilty of a crime. Even if this man once thought it was all right to use illegal drugs, the fact that he clearly still thinks so makes him utterly unsuitable to be a barrister. The fact that the set is willing to keep him is to their disgrace.

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  • Talking as someone who likes to get a bit drunk drinking Pimms on a sunny summer afternoon, who likes a beer; who enjoys polishing off a bottle of wine of an evening; who enjoys the occasional drunken night out getting stuck into rum and coke; who enjoys a few generous measures of whisky now and again; who has had countless drunken nights in his time, many of which in his earlier years he can only remember parts of...
    I condemn this! In fact, I don't just condemn this but think that he should have his career destroyed over it! Despicable!

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  • Probably half the barristers have tried coke.

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  • Pompous and pious lads! Let him without sin etc.....Suspect this will change him completely; knock his Eton supremacy attitude (if he has one) out of him....what of course is at fault is the UK's crazy drug laws. Well done 4 Square for showing compassion.

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  • Unbelievable, I didn't realise the Bar accepted criminals into it's ranks.
    Just goes to show, it's not what you are or what you do, it's who you are related to and what School/College you went to.
    Sad day for the bar really to see a clearly intelligent man make a choice to indulge in a criminal activity. His choice shows a complete disregard for the law and values Barristers are supposed to uphold. How his actions have not barred him holding the position of barrister and get away with it is frankly beyond me.
    Smacks of elitism/nepotism of the worst kind. It begs the question had he come from a comprehensive and not Eton and Oxbridge and his father was not a judge would he have been treated with the utmost leniency? I fear the answer is no.

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  • Thank goodness for 4 New Square showing a bit of common sense.
    Chris: the fact there was a caution is a strong indicator that the criminal law aspects of this have been taken care of. This was taken into account by both the BSB and chambers and I think the Bar is considerably better off having them in charge of such matters and not you.

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  • For goodness' sake - what on earth has this got to do with elitism? Everybody makes mistakes; the fact that Mr Mostyn went to Eton makes him no less worthy of redemption than anybody else.
    It has become all too trendy to criticise the Bar for being inaccessible and nepotistic. There might be good reasons for doing, so but this story does not evince any of them. Bringing up the issue at all seems to me to demonstrate an ill-informed reverse-snobbery that is just as bad as the elitism it seeks to condemn.

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  • taking drugs may be a criminal offence... now... but that is down to current fashions and mores. It is a pity that so many people seem to regard themselves as equipped to be moral arbiters of others. I'm sick of the pseudo-moralistic holier-than-thou censure that spews out at times like this: as a couple of previous comments have expressed, well done 4 New Square, and please, please, get a life, people...

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  • Well, Eton and Magdelene, the hoop's got a hole in... I understand he will now have to endure the life long shame of being referred to as 'Malleable Mostyn' in Chambers. Oh, the indignity of it all!

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  • I remember a guy from uni losing his training contract with a major city firm before he had even started it due to a conviction for fare evasion on the tube.
    Perhaps if he had been caught with a pocket full of coke and E's, been schooled at Eton and had a Judge for a dad he too would still have a career in law.

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  • Anonymous | 29-May-2012 3:36 pm - I think we can all agree that as long as your mate from uni went to a comprehensive and didn't have a judge as a father then it's fine that he lost his training contract, because (1) that's how things are run and (2) there's a huge amount of overlap between the way in which City law firms, chambers and the BSB approach disciplinary matters. I doubt your mate would have experienced the same treatment from a law firm, not least because The Lawyer would have the story on its front page, wringing its hands with mock outrage (the story having been leaked to it before any criminal process was started).

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  • Normally I wouldn't mind this, but since he went to Eton and his Dad is family judge Sir Nicholas Mostyn, I think he should be hung, drawn and quartered.

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  • de-bag and raddish the little twat I say

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  • If only I'd received the benefit of a proper education, such that I could go around gun-toting in Chelsea garden squares and on the Champs Elysée, flashing on commuter trains and posting marijuana to my uni pals whilst remaining on the judiciary, taking narcotics at will, slapping my other half because she plated dinner up too late and fiddling my expense account to high heaven.

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  • Wake up and smell the coffee those who are holier than thou. The guy set out to be a barrister not a member of the Plymouth brethren. Henry, brief on the way mate and well done 4 New Square- class top to bottom

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  • He didn't do anything wrong. Nothing wrong with a small amount of recreational drugs for personal use. He isn't hurting anybody, it doesn't affect his job and it doesn't show dishonesty.

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  • Interesting story. It's hard to separate the two elements, being (a) what is the correct punishment if any for this drugs offense and (b) did his background/connections have any impact, but I think the answers have to be:
    (a) none - the drugs law are a very expensive joke, and do more harm than good; and
    (b) possibly - but look at the background of the "average" trainee barrister - what is it? I don't have an up to date answer, but I'm assuming there may be something of the 1% about it.

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  • @anon - 29 May 3.36pm
    The key point is that dodging the tube fare is an offence of dishonesty, which is a far bigger issue for a solicitor or barrister than £40 of drugs for personal use.
    The boy went to Eton, and his father is a judge - neither are things within his control. He got a mathematics degree from Oxford and an Outstanding on the BPTC (down to his own intelligence and hard work, I expect). He's clearly exhibited poor judgement, and is paying for that in the press and by way of his police caution.
    (To me the 'elitism' arguments about law fall a bit flat - if City law firms/the Bar recruit mostly from the top 10 universities, isn't that an intellectual elitism, and what's wrong with that? Would you want to be defended at trial for a crime you didn’t commit/represented in the sale of your multi-million pound family business by an intellectual powerhouse with a first class degree from Oxford, or someone only bright enough to get a 2:2 from a former polytechnic? Which would you choose to instruct?)

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  • He's not a sportsman and he hasn't been dishonest. A harsh lesson learned and his image will forever be tainted - isn't that punishment enough?
    The number of young people who do coke nowadays is staggering. There's a wider issue to be dealt with in society at large, and curtailing a young barrister's career is not the answer.

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  • Astonishing the number of people who seem to think that doing coke is OK and comparable to drinking Pimms!
    @11:25 - I think it probably would affect his job if he was off his face on drugs.
    @2:00 - Is the wider problem of drugs in society going to be solved by turning a blind eye and letting people off when they break the law?
    As for the denials of elitism. Give me a break. Of course it's elitism - his daddy is a judge and he went to Eton. That's what's going to appear on the biog, not that he's a cokehead.

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  • The high-horsed snobbery and ignorance of those judging this pupil is disgraceful. Now we have evidence, albeit anonymously, of how truly out of touch some in our profession can be.
    We wonder why engineers and scientists are ignored when politicians assume they know what is right. The problem is cultural elitism, as these apologists listened to the politicians of their time and their ignorant mentors. Engineers' warnings were ignored before the Challenger disaster. Scientists and health professionals have been ignored regarding drug policy and actual harms associated with drugs. Politicians fail to realise, after consultation with a wide range of professionals, how the drug policies they promote perpetuate the illicit drug trade, increase instances of money laundering and tax evasion, criminalise the powerless, and enable individuals to acquire illicit drugs with more ease than acquiring alcohol when under the age of eighteen.
    The individuals complaining about this pupil are the kind that perpetuate this out of touch mentality in all public discourse.
    The crime was not one of dishonesty, nor was it one involving power over another whether sexual or violent.
    The wider problem in society is not one of drugs, but of the kind of ignorance displayed in this discussion. That same kind of ignorance perpetuates the deficiencies in most genuine problem solving efforts. Shameful.

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  • drug users come from all walks of life - male and female However it is there the similarity stops as for the poorer to finance their habit becomes more and more impossible so they turn to crime. Others can turn to 'Daddy' for help with finance. Having a son caught out can only cause the family embarrassment, and they will need help in understanding the disease of addiction and denial. Maybe this youngster is not too hooked - YET! Becoming clean is easy. STAYING clean is hard work without ongoing support from all classes of society. Very often it is a feeling of abandonment that induces loneliness and lack of true love. Drugs - and alcohol is a drug make no mistake - ease that sense of despondency by acting as depressants.. I cannot believe that his Chambers will not support him IF HE WANTS in a visit to a recognised treatment centre . Many sadly do not do so until it is too late.

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  • What's wrong with elitism?

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  • N.b. 4 New Sq. has not kicked him out from pupillage but they have also not (yet) offered him tenancy. Provided he wants it, which I assume he might, he'll have just one more thing to worry about at decision time now. I have a feeling this will 'hover' for young Mostyn for quite a while one way or another.

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  • I think the 'coke is OK' people hugely miss the point.
    1. I don't think you'd ever find a pharmacologist who thinks that statement is anything other then pure twaddle and ignorance...but, more to the point
    2. The drugs trade is ruthlessly exploitative of tens of thousands of people, responsible for thousands of deaths in the supply chain and tens of thousands among users annually. It is run by some of the most evil characters in the world and the source of an immense amount of acquisitive crime..which we all pay for in a variety of ways even if we do not suffer directly from it.
    Every time you take a line, think about that. It isn't sanctimonious to condemn evil and it is hypocrisy (for a lawyer) and idiocy (for anyone) to condone it.

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  • Forgive me if I do not instruct him, but I doubt whether 4 NS would have been so sympathetic if he had come from a comprehensive-
    0ops, I forgot- he wouldn't have been there in the first place...

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  • I couldn't even function on a Monday morning if I'd had a coked up Saturday night...
    I would, quite rightly, have been stripped of my training contract for this intollerable behaviour. Why on earth does this chap get away with it? It's quite plainly NEPOTISM!!

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  • Anonymous | 30-May-2012 4:06 pm
    I'm not quite sure what point you are trying to make in your hostile rant, but two points:
    1. I don't think many scientists and health professionals would promote the use of cocaine as harmless.
    2. Drug policies don't perpetuate the illicit drug trade - drug users do.
    Unfashionable it may be to people like you, but there are quite a lot of people who don't condone illegal drug use, particularly by someone who is supposed to represent the legal profession.

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  • Anonymous | 7-Jun-2012 3:57 pm
    Agree with you on point 1., however in relation to point 2. you seem to miss the point that it is of course the actual drug policies which make the drug trade "illicit". Legalisation is a complex issue but there are arguments to be made on both sides. You may also be aware of the increasing pressure from South American politicians for the end to the destructive and ultimately fruitless "war on drugs".

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