Corinne McPartland, reporter, and Husnara Begum, editor, Lawyer 2B

Focus, Careers: Second life

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  • I could not agree more! I was a corporate lawyer at a leading US law frim in London for 4 years and made the change 3 years ago to become a primary school teacher. It was certaily the right decision for me, and is rewarding in ways I could never have imagined, and in which law never was or could have been to me. It is certainly not the easy option though, but for me it is something law could never be - really good fun!!

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  • This is a good article about redundancy, from the glass half full perspective. I really do envy people like 'Bill' who can live comfortably for 18 months, and I suppose if I was in his shoes I could look on redundancy as liberating, and an opportunity to reassess.
    But I have been unemployed for 8 months now, and it's been a desperate, dire time. Over this period I've applied for literally hundreds of legal jobs, talked with about 30 agencies, and despite every effort have had 1 (one) interview. I've also watched my life savings evaporate almost completely, signed up for the jobseeker's allowance, and I'm afraid the effects have taken a heavy toll on my personal life.
    I genuinely want to stay in the legal profession, but am pretty much at the end of my wits as to what to do next. I've considered studying an LLM - but the prospect of returning to the job market in early 2011 in debt seems far too risky.
    Did I mention my area of expertise is property law.
    Any suggestions welcomed.

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  • As a mother of an unemployed lawyer I find the present situation around the legal profession doubly upsetting. I am a teacher and thought my daughter's ambition to become a solicitor was admirable, and that she was aiming to enter a prestigious and satisfying profession.
    To do that she has accrued a huge debt from a degree and an LPC, and being able to get a training contract only through working at rock bottom pay as a para legal for 3 years. She was then forced to take a pay cut as a trainee, that meant she was below the level needed to pay off her student loan at all. However pay is not all, careful support wold have helped her develop and gain satisfaction from work well done.
    However, she was never nurtured the way I see the education profession nurture its trainees and young teachers, with proper development plans,mentors and support.
    Despite what I considered to be a shoddy training experience, she has been utterly determined and single minded in her pursuit of a career. And now, after 9 months as a solicitor with good company,, she has been made redundant ,with no package, no notice and no advice. She has signed on at the job centre plus, been offered retraining as a Beautician! She has approached her local law society for help finding voluntary work but so far none is forthcoming.
    I am appalled by the way the Legal profession treats its young - I expect she has been unlucky in her treatment, but I wonder if the cavalier, uncaring way she has been treated is typical. I hope not.

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  • Well the reality of what happened in the 70's and 80's to industrial and manufacturing jobs, is now hitting the professions. i will not shed any tears

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