Travers 'discriminated against pregnant trainee', tribunal hears

  • Print
  • Comments (45)

Readers' comments (44)

  • Regarding clients paying for flexibility, I am not sure this has been suggested. Now that I have left private practice I see more clearly that the problem isn't the clients or work usually but the partnership's desire to run things on a shoe string staff to maximise profits rather than resource work correctly. This is more and more a problem in the recession where clearly the partnership are unable to countenance the reality of reduced money in the business. Consistently understaffed departments are the reason that my organisation is seriously considering changing law firms, they would be prepared to pay a bit more elsewhere actually for better service. That way there should be enough lawyers so that a more flexibility is available and we are not relying on overworked hyper stresspots and a void when those individuals cannot be there, which will happen from time to time. The law firms in question are foolish to think clients will not notice and be concerned by the undue stress placed on individuals where for example three fee earners are replaced by one and support staff cut. But what do I know, being a female solicitor who got out of private practice early rather than face being sidelined later on, no family yet and got better work than ever, can't see how this does anything but cause a loss to the firms that trained me where female trainees far outweighed the males and even HR admitted it was easier for males to get the training contract in the first place as firm desperate for boys who could cut it, so who will be left then all the women leave and why ever would they stay?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • Whether she was naive or not does not matter, because it is a law (unless it changes) that she deserves equal treatment compared to non-pregnant trainees (girls and lads alike) of same caliber and attitude to work.
    I think that we should try to get a law passed that women lawyers (or lawyers to be) were prohibited to have babies. They should be reasonable and think that they work is more important and to do they little bit to reduce world population.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • As a Cambridge graduate, Deputy General Counsel for a NASDAQ listed company and more importantly, mother of two, this is genuinely terrible press for Travers Smith and Andrew Lilley. Whether Ms Tantum will succeed in her efforts, one cannot be sure, yet it is clear that this will plant a seed of doubt in relation to the firm.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • "As a Cambridge graduate, Deputy General Counsel for a NASDAQ listed company and more importantly, mother of two, this is genuinely terrible press for Travers Smith and Andrew Lilley"

    To be honest, I didn't know Lilley was the mother of two.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

View results 10 per page | 20 per page | 50 per page

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (45)