Females make up just 20 per cent of honorary silk nominations

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  • More evidence that the system is flawed. But why have an honorary QC position anyway? What next? An honorary judge? An honorary politician?
    I think we should we just stick to QC appointments on the basis of merit.

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  • @ 1:44 pm: Honorary QC titles are given out on the basis of merit. People given the title are deemed to have earned it and are deemed to deserve it for the work they have done in a legal context. You are entitled to think they should not exist, but to imply that they are not given out on the basis of merit is misguided.

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  • The majority of stats like these which purport to highlight discrimination are completely misleading (and meaningless without being placed in a proper context).
    The reality is that you are only likely to be made an honorary QC if you have a fair few years behind you. Given that the ratio of men to women taking up a career in law (and many other professional occupations) in the 70s/80s was severely weighted towards men means that there will inevitably be far more men who meet the 'longevity' criteria today.
    To suggest that honorary QC appointments should be evenly weighted between men and women would itself be discriminatory if a more deserving male candidate was overlooked in order to appoint a female so as to create gender balance.

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