CoL launches New York Bar programme

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  • Is this scheme likely to be available to those students who have followed the traditional route completing a law degree and then the LPC?

    It appears from the wording to only be available to GDL students which i cannot see as a reasonable restriction.

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  • I'd imagine it'll be open to anyone and everyone willing to pay.

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  • In answer to Rebecca Brook-Smith’s question, UK LL.B graduates, (who have taken standard 3-year law degree programmes) are already able to sit for the New York Bar Exam without undertaking any further study, under the rules of eligibility administered by the New York State Board of Law Examiners.

    GDL students, on the other hand, have traditionally had to follow a much more convoluted route and to take a one-year full-time LL.M programme in the USA before they can become eligible to take the New York Bar Examination.

    The new College of Law JD programme will provide non-law graduates with the option to follow an alternative, and much more direct route to the NYB Examination and therefore to qualification as a lawyer in New York.

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  • Why would you sign up to this? Looks like a complete waste of money!

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  • Could u plz share some more details about the programme, as to where the exams are held and wat is the fee criteria, I am currently studying the LPC at BPP law school, i hope students from all the other law schools are eligible for this,

    looking forward to your response

    regards!

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  • Thank you for the information provided. I have been researching this with real difficulty as to what is true and what is merely oppinion. So as a LLB graduate i am eligible to take the NY bar exam, but would i have to do a prepatory course to adapt to the American system and have a realistic chance of passing the bar?
    Also if anyone could point me to a reliable source for more information about how to qualify to practice in either California or NY that would be great
    Thanks

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  • In response to Rebecca Brook-Smith, if you take time to look at ALL of the bars' rules, you'll find that you can take more than just the NY or the CA bar. For example, you can practice in Texas after a number of years working as a solicitor or you can sit the Maryland bar following admittance to another state's bar.

    I don't know why most people only restrict their knowledge to think that CA and NY are the only ones, because that is untrue.

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  • As far as I'm aware, LLB students can sit the course whenever they want - but will have to take a preparatory course in NY law. I believe this changes after you have practised for 2 years. My girlfriend and I (both working at US firms) plan to take advantage of this.

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  • Sorry, scratch that, it seems I've been misinformed. Practical experience will likely land you a job, but isn't necessary. If you've done an English Law degree (I.e. common law study in Britain), you ar eeligible to sit the exam at any point. Check the NY BOLE website, section 520.6

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  • Great, CoL is churning out another cash cow. I wonder how many students will buy this qualification in a misguided attempt at improving their CV. When their dreams of 70k a year in a city firm are shattered, they will start applying for smaller UK firms who couldn't care less that you bought an american qualification.

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