CoL, Kaplan lift lid on LPC graduate success rates

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  • Surely an important question is how many of the 62%/71% (of the 74% who graduate) who secured training contracts had already secured them before they started the LPC? That would give a better indication of the prospects of obtaining a training contract if you start the LPC without one.

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  • Okay, so does this 84% include those students who already had training contracts before arriving at the College of Law?
    Future trainees of A&O, Linklaters and Clifford Chance HAVE to take the LPC there, for example. It's misleading to imply that they got a training contract because they went to the CoL - in fact it's the other way round: the College of Law is taking them because they already have a training contract to go to.
    A more useful statistic for those thinking of applying to law school would be the answer to: "What percentage of students who didn't have a training contract when starting the LPC did within a year of finishing the course?"

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  • I finished up Kaplan in 2010 and no one has ever asked me what I am up to after finishing - so where did they get these figures from? Perhaps, only asking a selection of students i.e. the ones that they knew had a training contract or paralegal role?
    Also, I would say that 60% of the students already had a training contract lined up before starting so in terms of helping people who did not have one the figures are pretty poor really.

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  • It would also be interesting to see these figures compared against the number of people on the full time LPC and also compare this against others courses such as the part time LPC.
    It is wholly irresponsible for the CoL and other providers such as KAPLAN to publish statistics that mislead customers i.e. students to take the LPC on the basis that they will get a TC. Institutions need to start taking their responsibilities more seriously rather than looking to increase their business profits.

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  • I have a training contract and my firm makes me complete the LPC at the College of Law, as do many other City firms. It would be interesting to see the statistics in relation to how many training contracts were actually secured by students prior to starting at the College. I suspect there was a reason this information wasn't published.

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  • What would be equally interesting, in addition to those comments aired above, would be to see the percentage of GDL students at such 'law schools' that (a) continue onto the LPC and (b) manage to secure a training contract, not having previously acquired one.

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  • I studied the GDL and LPC at the College of Law between 2007 and 2009. I had already secyured a training contract at a Magic Circle form prior to commencing the GDL. Of those I met who did not already have a training contract when starting the GDL(about 30- 50%) a very small percentage managed to subsequently secure one. Of those who did not have a TC at the start ofthe LPC (slightly skewed as it was based on people I met socially rather than in class- I was on a firm-specific course and so only had classesd with future trainees at other firms) a tiny percentage ended up getting interviews, let alone TCs.

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  • I also think the article's use of the phrase "secured work in the legal profession" is also misleading and very deliberate as this can mean anything from TC/paralegal to working for a legal body in a non-law role or working for a legal training provider which is not actually using the LPC after having completed it. I think this is Kaplan's attempt to put a positive spin on declining confidence in the LPC.

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  • Does anyone enrol on the LPC wanting to become a paralegal - I doubt it! In some places, getting a job as a paralegal will actually mean that you can't apply for a TC at that firm.
    And the Institute of Paralegals is putting in place training towards a separate career path for paras so if you wanted to become a paralegal you wouldn't need to spend upwards of £12K for the LPC.
    As a recruiter, I can honestly say that having an LPC from the COL (or anywhere else) will not sway me in any way. If a candidate has an interesting and varied CV (as well as reasonable A levels and degree), I will want to talk to them. We give no credit for an LPC grade in our scoring system.

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  • The fact that in the comment above a recruiter gives no credit to a candidate with an LPC from a leading provider is a great shame and testimony that you would not want such a person handling your career. An LPC is what it says on the tin - a practical course and that is why many law firms are happy to take paralegals with an LPC and then offer them training contracts as a result of the work they do.
    A different outcome to a recruiter who simply screens people out on the basis of academic results.

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  • Can't anybody here do simple maths?
    There may be about 14000 total LPC places made available at all law schools but there are only about 7000 actual enrolments each year. With pass rates averaging about 75% that means about 5000 LPC graduates passing each year - which is just above the number of available and registered training contracts. So it only takes small variances to move between over or under supply. Not complicated and not controversial.

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  • So given the graduation rate, only 81% of 74% of those who commenced the LPC in 2009 actually completed this survey. So using the figures above I calculate there would have been around 3212 people who commenced the LPC in 2009 with CoL therefore using the full figures surely it should read like this:

    26% did not graduate (so definitely don’t have TCs, but may be paralegalling)

    40% didn’t answer this survey (including those who didn’t graduate)

    14% graduated, but didn’t answer this survey

    37% said they had TCs (I wonder how many already had them – these stats would be interesting)

    13% said they are paralegalling (you do not do the LPC to become a paralegal).

    So ultimately only 37% got/already had TCs and even if we take it that the 14% who didn’t answer did have TCs this only brings up the figure to 51%.

    At worst 63% and at best 49% of 2009/2010 LPC students paid the CoL money to do the LPC and didn’t get a TC.

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