Nisha Beerjeraz, ex-BPP LPC student

Britain's got talent

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  • The author should perhaps stop to consider that if she started the LPC last September then she had had the opportunity to apply for training contracts in two previous rounds before the financiers 'infiltrated law firms' this year. I can only assume that she didn't get a training contract during those two years as she isn't one of the 'strongest law students' that she mentions.

    If after two years of rejections you choose to take on huge amounts of debt, as an adult, you have nobody but yourself to blame. This current market will make things harder for good law students to acquire training contracts but it will also make it easier for people like the author to blame others for their own lack of self-awareness. What exactly is the author suggesting that the Law Society owe her exactly?

    For the next few years aspiring solicitors will simply have to strive to be better applicants and realise that there are plenty of training contracts out there but you're not entitled to one simply because you chose to study law at university. The most constructive thing to do would be to focus on being a better than 'average applicant' because average is unlikely to cut it in this market and nor should it.

    Best of luck to all the law students who have applied for training contracts recently and the non-law students applying in the Autum!

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  • I have read these posts with interest. I am currently in the position of applying for training contracts 1 year after graduating from university with a law degree. I decided not to pay for the LPC being aware of the risks involved.
    I have worked for a year now in a call centre, which I do not enjoy in the slightest. However it is still useful experience I can draw of during both my applications and interviews. I have currently secured 1 interview and I am awaiting the outcomes of my other applications. I think the key is to stay positive and keep trying. If you take feedback from interviews you can build on previous failures.

    Finally I was also wondering if you are that bothered about securing a training contract what were you doing winging online the day before the deadline for applications? Surely that time could have been spend checking your applications or submitting a final app? Then maybe you would have the training contract you believe you deserve.

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  • The blogger could always go into modelling?

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  • I take a walk everyday!!!Haha

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  • I totally agree with Nisha, It is very frustrating being rejected again and again, and there is a lot of desrimination also involved, and certain classes and races are always descriminated against. The figures show us that there are about 6000 TC registered every year, and there is about 6500-7000 candidates who pass the LPC, so we have about backlog of 1000( roughly, that is, may be lesser) every year, I'm sure if there is will to accommodate the students, then additional 1000 TC's wouldn't be a problem. See I provide you with the solution if at all there is a will to do it. 1: the law schools must only admit the set number of candidates for the LPC each year, depending on the number of TC's on offer. there should be a quota to cover the backlog. 2: the firms, and their so called limited resurces can easily slash some salaries, say for example a firm (big firms here) paying 40k/a to its 50, or may be 80 trainees can easily slash 5k on each to accommodate the rest awaiting job offers.. And then if in this scenario if the admission process to law schools is made a little more tougher wouldnt really matter, and will be welcomed. At least it would be better than the current scenario where you are accepted in each and every law school you apply to, pay your fees, commence the LPC and then there is a darkest alley ahead, and then you have to think of other options, switching professions.. I know that ppl with excellent grades might disagree with me but if this scheme is followed with the help of some regulation by the Law Society then the days are not far when the candidates will have a guaranteed place for a TC right when they're accepted at the Institution for the LPC. See the point is that we(consistently rejected applicants perhaps because of our ethnic background ) dont want to stay in foreign countries for long, but we do want to finish our studies( in this case Qualify as a Solicitor). then we always return back to our countries and start practicing there.. My final plea to the Law Society would be (because it is virtually impossible for us to secure a TC these days) to recognise the work experience undertaken in other jurisdictions and count it towards the qualifying requirements for becoming a solicitors.. I know this isnt the right forum for this request but at least i'm talking to the people in the same boat..

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  • I actually do agree that it's a bit like a lottery. I put in a huge amount of effort in researching some firms and putting together a fairly good application but was rejected.
    At the same time, I bumped off generic cover letters and bad quality CVs but got interviews.

    So far, out of five interviews lined up, only one of them was a remotely researched application.

    As for increasing numbers of applications, one of the top five North East firms received 'a record number of applications'...two hundred.

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  • The training contract search shouldn't be ending either, there are more than enough firms that recruit throughout the year for various start dates.

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  • I am guessing Nisha made 20+ applications for the last 3 years. How strange that she did not eventually get lucky.

    People should appreciate that whilst (with anything in life) there is an element of luck; the best people are getting training contracts. In fact lots of people find it easy on the basis of obviously strong applications.

    The ability of people to delude themselves is amazing ("Only after the majority of law firms have deferred their graduate recruitment to next year has the Law Society decided to speak up") - I have no idea how someone could say this.

    As for law students complaining about would be bankers stealing "their" jobs, please!

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  • The people getting training contracts are not always 'the best', they just happen to be quite skilled in getting through the recruitment process.

    If all solicitors and trainees were 'the best' then there wouldn't be any negligence claims against the legal profession.

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  • I'm currently doing a GDL - I haven't got a training contract and will not take the LPC until I have secured one. You would have to have your head stuck in the ground or alternatively in Daddy's purse to know that you are taking a severe financial risk.

    At the end of the day, if you are good enough you will get a job eventually. Requesting that there should only be enough LPC places as there are for jobs is basically saying 'boohoo the competition is too tough and I want to walk into a job'.

    As for well researched application forms, I did 4 this year and have secured 2 assessment centres - not too shabby. I think it helps when you have some sort of experience with the firm. If you can just swap the names of law firms into your pre-written answers of why you want to work for them, then it's crap.

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