Inns of Court funding scheme has created 30 new pupillages

  • Print
  • Comments (2)

Readers' comments (2)

  • The COIC needs to explain exactly what it has done here. It does not seem obviously right or indeed legal, for 4 charities to use their funds to financially prop-up independent businesses - quite regardless of the worthiness of those businesses day to day pursuits.

    In effect this is the tenants of the inns subsidising the publicly funded bar. That may or may not be acceptable practice. But it needs to be transparent and accountable practice.

    We shall ignore for a moment the fact that the publicly funded bar created their own problems by consistently over providing pupillages in the last decades. This has created an over supply of publicly funded barristers and naturally led to the reduction in fees by successive governments. If you tax the non-publicly funded bar in order to allow the publicly funded bar to carry on destroying itself then all you do is pull the non-publicly funded bar down with them. Initiating this tax under the pretence of charitable status is galling.

    Whichever smoke filled room this decision came from is a disgrace - no transparency, no accountability, obvious concerns over charities law ignored - "don't worry we're really old institutions, just look at our medieval halls" just won't cut it as an answer.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

  • If the work was there, the sets would be willing to fund their own pupillages in order to bring more juniors on board to assist with a heavy workload.

    If, as seems likely, the work isn't there, then why are the Inns funding pupils who are just being set up to fail at a later stage?

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

Mandatory Required Fields

Mandatory

Comments that are in breach or potential breach of our terms and conditions in particular clause 8, may not be published or, if published, may subsequently be taken down. In addition we may remove any comment where a complaint is made in respect of it. These actions are at our sole discretion.

  • Print
  • Comments (2)