Bang goes the law degree

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  • It's probably going to change quicker than anyone realises, look to the work of Prof Katz in this area and it begs a lot of questions about future legal education.
    http://www.slideshare.net/Danielkatz/the-mit-school-of-law-presentation-version-102-101411

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  • "the Russell Group of universities ... ­graduates “are highly valued by employers, less because of what was done or learned on the degrees than for the kind of inherent qualities they are seen as having".

    Yes, Daddy's old school tie. Pathetic.

    As for the eight suggestions - the majority are inherent in any LLB at the moment, with things like "Cases", "Lesislation" and "critical legal rasoning" being requried for so much as a pass in any coursework.

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  • I personally think that this is a terrible idea..

    The real issue is too much supply and too little demand. With only very few places to offer its only normal that Im going to hire those who graduate from a top university and top degree.

    If you really want to solve the problem just reduce the supply of graduates by making law only available at the upper universities and have higher entry standards, but please do not go around and butcher a field that has been one of the foundations of this country only because some one who couldn't get into a Russell Group can't find a job.

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  • above comment; elitist but true and fair

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  • Perhaps it's time to stop the handing out law degrees with grades , that are virtualy useless i.e. 2:2's and thirds. The market ( well the vast majority of it) does not want anybody with anything less than a 2:1 It should therefore be that if you end up below or cannot reach the grade for a 2:1 then you have failed simple as that! Otherwise what is the point of letting people progress on , when there is virtually no market for them to work in afterwards? That's my opinion.

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  • It would appear that the dishing out of Law degree's has caught up with the industry, therefore they are doing something about it. Too many people may have 2.1 or higher classifications, which also contributes to the saturated market. Just a shame that current students that have worked hard (with the belief) to attain a Law degree, would benefit them in the workplace. s for handing out degree's with classifications of 2.2 or lower does serve a purpose, it easily identifies those that don't cut the mustard whilst still enabling students to use such to continue ploughing money into LPC courses or Master's, which then ultimately increases the profits of Universities/exam boards, which in some cases have deliberately ensured that students have not achieved a higher degree classification in the first instance via doing more in the exam process to reduce inflated grading. The only winners are the Universities and exam providers, Law Degree's have been a cash cow for years and as such the legal profession has lost faith in the students which hold them, except of course from the prestigious (Toff) universities.

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  • Fundamentally Law degree's have been cash cows for Universities for years (just look at the tuition fees year on year increases). Whilst a saturated market requires dealing with, and the fact that employers have lost faith in the quality of these degrees. To not achieve a 2.1 or higher in the current climate makes no difference to a law student as any law degree holder (apart from the prestigious/Toff Universities) are simply not required. However it is good business to allow such students to continue onto LPC's or Masters as it increases profits for Universities.

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