The age of marketing

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  • Quite a few football teams play in yellow (eg Norwich), but it is strange that no big law firms brand themselves in yellow. Does yellow send out bad messages?

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  • The colour thing is quite interesting when you compare to other professional services, particularly accountants.

    Deloitte, PwC and Ernst and Young all use/have used bright colours in their logos. Crowe Clark has used yellow, BDO has bright red, and once had yellow, Mazars has yellow etc.etc.

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  • It is interesting that no important law firms have ever been branded in yellow, whereas there are quite a few accountants who have adopted that colour.

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  • Brave of Keoghs to brand themselves in brown.

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  • Yellow has negative associations when matched with black : Danger.

    That is why no leading law firm in the UK uses it in their branding.

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  • Yellow and black works alright for Ernst & Young, approx. 16 x more revenue than largest UK firm..... just sayin..

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  • No major firm will adopt yellow and black in the next 5 years, simply because it's associated with the tainted brand of dickinson dees.

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  • The moment a government and indeed Parliament focus on image rather than substance then by degree the substance goes. The long standing principle that there was to be no advertising in the legal profession once removed has let in a flood tide of litigation that in the long term is corrosive to all and to the legal profession probably more so.
    Reputations and 'brands' have to be built and are made over time on the quality and consistency of the 'good's .While the legal profession has never had a good press its integrity and longstanding consistency in regards to the rule of law was never in question. Now, in many an eye it is the love of money that drives it.

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  • Really interesting piece. We are already seeing how marketing and branding play such and an important role and one thing which is key to the future success of firms like those I've worked with making this happen online which is the biggest trend in consumer behaviour. We've seen in the US popular online services get traction but what really excites me is the role of services that help a lot of the smaller firms get a marketing presence and lots of these firms are very good. New companies like MrLawyer.co.uk which I saw was featured in the law gazette are doing this well in the UK and they are bound to become more and more popular because its services like that that enable customers to be able to go to one place and receive impartial and transparent quotes for particular work. Its important for us legal professionals that we keep up with these online trends and remain competitive using new online services where customers are going.

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  • Fantastic read! I head up the marketing for a small but growing law firm in the East Midlands and we have been analysing data for a potential brand alteration. Our core colours are white, lime green and minimulistic black and it has been the green that attracts most attention. It is compelling to read into people's perceptions of a business by the colour schemes, the design of their branding and even down to the size proportions used when placing logos and branding onto websites and materials.

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  • Forget that this fabulous article is about "big law" I think this should be a mandatory read for every law firm in the country. Brilliantly written.

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